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Suppose person from Brazil (say) wants to convert to Judaism. He goes to a local Orthodox Jewish community speaks with the rabbi, and does whatever the rabbi says in order to convert according to Orthodox Halacha. Will he be recognized as Jewish in all Jewish communities in the world? If not, what authority is needed - the chief rabbi of his city? The chief rabbi of Brazil? Or something else?

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  • There is a series of Venn Diagrams of which Beit Din's conversions are acceptable to whom, but b'gadol: 1) A conversion by one of the Lithuanian Batei Din of Bnei Brak will be acceptable to almost everyone who accepts the idea of conversion in our times; 2) A conversion by the Israeli State Rabbinate will be acceptable to most people except some who take issue with the existence of the State of Israel; 3) a conversion by the RCA will be acceptable to everyone who accepts 2) and most who accept 1); Feb 15 at 9:29
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    Thanks. The main problem with 1, 2, 3 is that it requires visa, and some people cannot get visa from their country to enter Israel or USA. So 4 may be a better option. Is there a list of which chief rabbies are acknowledged? Feb 15 at 9:31
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    Yes, @Erel, that's where it gets tricky. Using the random example you cited, citizens of most South American countries do not require a tourist visa to visit Israel. On the other hand, options 1) and 2) entail at least a year or two of study at a Yeshiva that takes foreign conversion students, so they will need to arrange that and get a student visa anyway. Feb 15 at 9:35
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    There is a list of authorities recognized by the Chief Rabbi of Israel for the purpose of recognition in Israel (itim.org.il/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/…) I do not know how up to date it is and whether a more recent list exists - if the goal was to make alyah to Israel as a Jew, one could contact itim.org.il/en who might be able to help
    – mbloch
    Feb 15 at 9:41
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    More broadly, the answer to your question depends on what sort of recognition is being asked and in what country. Generally speaking, it is easier to get recognized to join a minyan or get an alyah, than to get married or immigrate to Israel. Broadly speaking the reputation for seriousness of the beit din which oversaw the conversion is a key driver of recognition
    – mbloch
    Feb 15 at 9:43

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