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If someone bought something that was sold to them by means of geneivat daat (though they were not technically lied to), do they have an inherent right to get refunded?

By geneivat daat I mean something misleading was done but the person was not lied to. For example: a merchant selling an artificial diamond but just saying it’s jewelry without specifying whether it is natural or not.

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    Selling a fake diamond as real is not genevat daat, it's onaah/fraud.
    – shmosel
    Commented Feb 7 at 4:46
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    So you charged a fair market price but they were under the misconception they were getting a real diamond for $12.99? Sounds like a them problem.
    – shmosel
    Commented Feb 7 at 5:00
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    If you're deliberately misleading, I guess it is a problem: sefaria.org/Kitzur_Shulchan_Arukh.63.4?lang=bi
    – shmosel
    Commented Feb 7 at 5:03
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    There are various madregos of fake diamonds, ranging from synthetic diamonds (which can be extremely expensive), moissanite (which can also be very expensive), through to cubic zirconia, quartz and glass. You would imagine that the halachah is that the madregah of "fake" that the buyer can reasonably expect is directly proportional to the price band in which he was sold the stone.
    – The GRAPKE
    Commented Feb 7 at 9:55

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