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Shemoth 10:13 - "So Moses held out his rod over the land of Egypt, and יהוה drove an east wind over the land all that day and all night; and when morning came, the east wind had brought the locusts."

Shemoth 10:19 -"Hashem caused a shift to a very strong west wind, which lifted the locusts and hurled them into the Sea of Reeds; not a single locust remained in all the territory of Egypt."

Why does the Torah specify that west wind hurled them into the "Sea of Reeds", mentioning the location of to where the wind drove them away; on the other hand, it doesn't mention any location from where does the east wind brought the locusts?

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According to Rashi it was in order to showcase their trajectory whilst also outlining the borders.

ימה סוף. אוֹמֵר אֲנִי שֶׁיַּם סוּף הָיָה מִקְצָתוֹ בַּמַּעֲרָב, כְּנֶגֶד כָּל רוּחַ דְּרוֹמִית, וְגַם בְּמִזְרָחָה שֶׁל אֶרֶץ יִשְׂרָאֵל, לְפִיכָךְ רוּחַ יָם תְּקָעוֹ לָאַרְבֶּה בְּיָמָּה סוּף כְּנֶגְדּוֹ. וְכֵן מָצִינוּ לְעִנְיַן תְּחוּמִין שֶׁהוּא פּוֹנֶה לְצַד מִזְרָח, שֶׁנֶּאֱמַר "מִיַּם סוּף וְעַד יָם פְּלִשְׁתִּים" (לקמן כג לא) מִמִּזְרָח לְמַעֲרָב, שֶׁיָּם פְּלִשְׁתִּים בַּמַּעֲרָב הָיָה, שֶׁנֶּאֱמַר בַּפְּלִשְׁתִּים "יוֹשְׁבֵי חֶבֶל הַיָּם גּוֹי כְּרֵתִים" (צפניה ב'):

ימה סוף INTO THE RED SEA — I say that the Red Sea was, as to part of it, in the west opposite the whole southern side of Palestine, and was also eastward of the Land of Israel; therefore a west wind blew the locusts into the Red Sea which was in the opposite direction to the west of Egypt. Thus do we find mentioned regarding the boundaries of Palestine that it (the Red Sea) faces the east of Palestine, since it states, (Exodus 23:31) “[And I will set thy boundaries] from the Red Sea even unto the sea of the Philistines”, which means from east to west since the sea of the Philistines was in the west, as it is said of the Philistines, (Zephaniah 2:5) “the inhabitants of the sea-coast, the nation of the Cherethites (the Philistines)”.

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