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According to Halacha, can Gid Hanashe be nullified according to the laws of bitul (nullification of non kosher if it’s 1/60 or less in a meal)? Or is it similar to Chametz on Pesach which can’t be nullified?

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It can be nullified unless the (biblically) forbidden section remains intact. See Shulchan Aruch Yoreh Deah 100:1:

בריה דהיינו כגון נמלה או עוף טמא וגיד הנשה ואבר מן החי וביצה שיש בה אפרוח וכיוצא בהם אפי' באלף לא בטלה... הגה ועיקר גיד הנשה אינו אלא על הכף בלבד והוא כרוחב ד' אצבעות ואם הוא שלם מקרי בריה

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    The reason here is that a complete nerve is a berya (let's roughly translate as "organism"); that's completely different than Chametz on Pesach. If I know that one teaspoon of ground-up sciatic nerve fell into this giant pot of potato soup, the soup is kosher.
    – Shalom
    Dec 18, 2023 at 4:22
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    If it is intact and can be identified, it can be removed from the food, and the associated fats are batel b'shishim. 100:2 and 65:9 are also relevant for a complete answer. | @Shalom The Taz cites the leniency of the Rashba that since we rule אין בגידין בנותן טעם, even a simple majority of permitted food is enough to nullify ground-up sciatic nerve (as opposed to the Shulchan Aruch who requires a 60:1 ratio to nullify it). The Taz indicates that we can rely on this leniency if we are uncertain about the proportions.
    – Fred
    Dec 18, 2023 at 6:07
  • @Fred But if was intact and then broke down during cooking it's still a problem.
    – shmosel
    Dec 18, 2023 at 7:51
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    @shmosel In that case, the gid would be batel b'shishim, or, according to the Rashba, batel b'rov. See my previous comment.
    – Fred
    Dec 18, 2023 at 7:55
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    Yes, that's why this answer is technically not wrong, but also misleading vis-a-vis the way the question was phrased.
    – Shalom
    Dec 18, 2023 at 13:40

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