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Do the views of Habad differ from other streams of Orthodox Judaism as regards Noahidism?

For example, how to apply to Noahide halacha?

I wonder if the views on Noahides are different (ideologically/theologically) or the same in these areas.

PS : The reason I ask is partly due to the historical issues between the Vilna Gaon and Shneur Zalman. In addition, Habad's view of theology is at times different than other streams of Orthodox Judaism. Due to these different views, I asked a question because the views on noahide would also be different. I am curious about the difference in views on noahide in the difference between habadnic's theological view of Judaism and the existing orthodox Judaism

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    habadnic Judaism is orthodox Judaism.
    – MichoelR
    Jul 26, 2023 at 2:14
  • @MichoelR yes, but Chabad has a separate brand identity. The question would better be phrased as "Chabad vs. common non-Chabad"
    – Shalom
    Jul 26, 2023 at 15:34
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    @MichoelR The reason I made this distinction was partly due to historical issues with vilna gaon and Shneur Zalman. In addition, habadnic's view of theology has a different position from the existing orthodox Judaism.
    – W.S
    Jul 27, 2023 at 0:31
  • @W.S I don't think the historical issues are relevant. The only thing that matters is that the previous Lubavitcher Rebbe instituted a program of encouraging the Noahide Laws to non-Jews. So they do it in practice, and the rest of us mostly leave it alone.
    – MichoelR
    Jul 28, 2023 at 0:44
  • @MichoelR I thought so too at first. However, while looking at the halacha related to avodah zara, I wondered if the point of view of noahide, which they established away from the 13 principles of rambam's faith, could be the same as that of orthodox Judaism. Especially in the issue of history, I know that it started with the controversy about the unity of hashem and the point of the problem of the pantheistic part.
    – W.S
    Jul 28, 2023 at 1:48

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Not particularly, no.

There are occasional disputes amongst halachic authorities about various aspects of Noahide Law; you may find Chabad decided to follow one interpretation on some detail than another one, but the outline is the same. (There's a dispute, for instance, whether any forms of birth control are prohibited for non-Jews, but I'm not aware of there being a "Chabad" vs "non-Chabad" position.)

The big sticking point, actually, is the issue of "proselytization." If I'm not mistaken, the 7th Rebbe zt"l was big on spreading the word about Noahidism -- and consequently, encouraging American prohibitions on abortion; while R' Moshe Feinstein zt"l felt we should stay in our own lanes.

Rabbi Jeremy Wieder explains:

Which, if any, position should Orthodox Jews, individually or collectively, adopt publicly regarding the likely demise of Roe v. Wade, and on abortion legislation in general?

... The Lubavitcher Rebbe was in favor of Jews’ doing everything possible to encourage adherence to Noahide law on the part of gentiles, including advocacy for legislation that would enforce Noahide law....

... His stringent position on abortion notwithstanding, Rav Moshe Feinstein disagreed with the Lubavitcher Rebbe and opposed legislation prohibiting abortion. In general, Rav Feinstein opposed legislation in any area that might give any religion a voice in government matters.

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  • Thank you for providing the link to the article in the Jewish Press. If you read it, then you understood that nothing in the article states what you are presenting in your answer. That the Rebbe advocated for teaching and increasing awareness of the 7 Noahide laws among the gentiles is accurate. But the balance of the statement, that this has consequences in regard to Roe v. Wade and abortion law, is solely the reasoning of the author of the article. The OP is not asking about abortion. He is asking about "Noahide". Perhaps the OP needs to clarify his question. Jul 26, 2023 at 16:11
  • @YaacovDeane I'm afraid we disagree -- please read the article carefully. The author isn't putting words into the Rebbe's mouth; I've asked others too, and it's apparently well-known that the Rebbe advocated for the US to prohibit more abortions (in the 1960s or 1970s) as part of his broader philosophy of encouraging Sheva Mitzvos observance.
    – Shalom
    Jul 26, 2023 at 19:43
  • As for the original question, I suggested one difference between Chabad and others vis-a-vis- Noahide Law is how loudly we promote it in general society, and whether adoption of its elements in the US legal system should be a political goal of ours.
    – Shalom
    Jul 26, 2023 at 19:44
  • @Shalom The reason I made this distinction was partly due to historical issues with vilna gaon and Shneur Zalman. In addition, habadnic's view of theology has a different position from the existing orthodox Judaism. Due to these different views, I asked a question because the views on noahide would also be different. Rather than answering the relevant part, I am curious about the difference in views on noahide in the difference between habadnic's theological view of Judaism and the existing orthodox Judaism.
    – W.S
    Jul 27, 2023 at 0:33
  • @W.S It would help if you put all this into the question, as well as back up some of these statements. For many people, the disagreements are old news, and the theological differences are subtle or non-existent, so showing exactly where you are coming from would greatly aid the fine folk here in figuring out what is the best answer to the question.
    – Rabbi Kaii
    Jul 27, 2023 at 17:04

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