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Are converts with a Jewish father (let's say Shmuel) also called ben Avraham (instead of ben Shmuel)?

Is this so, since your gentile descent is kind of wiped out through the act of conversion?

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2 Answers 2

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They should be called Ben Abraham but as a courtesy can go by their father's name.

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    Correct; in common usage (e.g. aliyahs), people get away with it. In a Gett or Kesubah it has to be right, though you may even get away with "ben Ploni hamegadlo" ("who raised him", implying the Jewish father is not the Halachic father); or what's written in the kesubah doesn't always have to be what's written out-loud ...
    – Shalom
    Jul 6, 2023 at 20:11
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    I've seen "ben Avraham, known as ben Shmuel" written. Jul 6, 2023 at 20:17
  • @MauriceMizrahi that's better, because it tells you the whole story. But hamegadlo is shorter, easier to hide to the untrained eye/ear, and gives the biological father more credit.
    – Shalom
    Jul 7, 2023 at 1:57
  • As Clint said, people can get away with it. I was told that it is okay for a convert with a Jewish father to use his father's hebrew name instead of 'Ben Avraham'. On the other hand, if the father was a Levi/Kohen, that does NOT mean that the convert could get a 'Levi or Kohen' Aliyah. Getting an Aliyah as a Levi/Kohen would be totally off limits. Jul 7, 2023 at 13:37
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yeshiva.co answers your question (here)

A child born to a non-Jewish mother is non-Jewish regardless to the father's status. Therefore all that applies to a convert applies in this case as well – halachicaly he is not his father's son.

He will be called "Ben Avraham Avinu" – at least for Gett and Ketubah matters. (Piskei Din Yerushalaim)

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  • I agree. If I was a Rav, this would be my opinion too. Calling a convert by their Jewish father's hebrew name just makes things ripe for confusion. It also has a semblance of trying to cover up a lie. Jul 7, 2023 at 13:39

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