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I am looking for Jewish sources that discuss when leaders can justifiably lie to their people for a greater purpose. (Reasons might be to avoid a panic, to avoid revealing sensitive secrets, to spare their feelings, to fool or avoid informing the enemy, to avoid depressing them when mayhem is unavoidable, and many others.)

I found sources that say one is permitted to lie to save a life, keep the peace, make people feel good, appear humble and modest, and protect oneself from loss or harm. But nothing on my question.

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    Avoid informing the enemy sounds a lot like protecting from harm. Same with a lot of these.
    – Double AA
    May 3 at 1:41
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    The problem is that a leader can invoke "protecting from harm" to justify any lie he chooses to utter. I am sure our sages tightened that, somewhere. May 3 at 4:12
  • Anyone can invoke things wrongly if they aren't careful.
    – Double AA
    May 3 at 12:07
  • "I found sources that say one is permitted to lie to save a life, keep the peace, make people feel good, appear humble and modest, and protect oneself from loss or harm." If anyone may lie for these purposes, so too may a leader. Isn't this just a question of scale? May 3 at 14:59
  • @Deuteronomy - When so many people are involved, the rules may change. May 3 at 16:06

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