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According to 2 Chronicles 28,

Aram-Damascus, under Rezin, and Israel, under Pekah, attempted to depose Ahaz through an invasion. Judah was being defeated and, according to 2 Chronicles 28, lost 120,000 troops in just one day. Many significant officials were killed, including the king's son Maaseiah. Many others were taken away as slaves.

According to Isaiah 7

Isaiah tells King Ahaz that the invasion will be unsuccessful and tells him to ask God for a sign. Ahaz refuses, claiming he does not want to test God. Isaiah then announces that God himself will choose the sign, etc.

The question:

Prophet Isaiah's visit to Ahaz in Isaiah 7, was it before or after what happened in 2 Chronicles 28- 5:15?

If the visit and prophecy of Emanuel, was before the horrible things that happened in 2 Chronicles 28- 5:15, then how could the prophecy of Emanuel had been a promise of salvation, protection to the house of David, from the danger of the impending invasion of Aram and Ephraim?

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    "Isaiah tells King Ahaz that the invasion will be unsuccessful ..." (1) Did Isaiah tell King Ahaz that the invasion wouldn't happen? (2) Isaiah 7:5-6 says: "Because the Arameans—with Ephraim and the son of Remaliah—have plotted against you, saying, ‘We will march against Judah and invade and conquer it, and we will set up as king in it the son of Tabeel,’" Did they conquer Judah? Did they set the son of Tabeel as king there? They, and the Assyrians, certainly wreaked havoc in Judah, but was the invasion successful? – Tamir Evan Jun 7 at 2:20
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    "... [H]ow could the prophecy of Emanuel had been a promise of salvation, protection to the house of David, from the danger of the impending invasion of Aram and Ephraim"? What protection to the house of David was prophesied? That non of Ahaz's sons will die in the invasion?? Ahaz was succeeded by his son Hezekiah (2 Chronicles 28:27). – Tamir Evan Jun 7 at 2:31
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    When was the prophecy of Emanuel supposed to be fulfilled? Isaiah 7:14,16 says: "Look, the young woman is with child and about to give birth to a son ... For before the lad knows to reject the bad and choose the good ...". That would suggests that these prophesied events are some time after the impending invasion. – Tamir Evan Jun 7 at 2:55
  • thank you Tamir for the comments. – capri reds Jun 7 at 4:25
  • some of bible commentaries ,put this visit after what happened in 2 Chronicles 28. ! – capri reds Jun 7 at 4:50
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According to Rabbi Yigal Ariel in his book on Yesha'ayhu, "Hamevaser", pt. 1, pg. 130-131, first Aram and Israel attacked Judah as described in Chronicles 2:28 and then, subsequently, Yesha'ayhu came to speak with Achaz to try to convince him not to beg for help from the Assyrians.

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  • thanx Harel , the words of Rabbi Yigal Ariel makes much sense.. most bible commentaries agree with him,though some disagree... that is why I was confused. now I'm convinced that the visit came after the attack ..the prophet's advice was right ,and history proved it, – capri reds Jun 10 at 4:22
  • I also heard that "Yesha'ayhu came to speak with Achaz to try to convince him not to beg for help from the Assyrians". I didn't see it in the words of Yesha'ayhu (beyond the promise that Aram and Israel's conquest won't last long, as Assyria will conquer both kingdoms in the near future anyway). From where does R. Yigal Ariel conclude that was Yesha'ayhu's intent? – Tamir Evan Jun 11 at 15:37
  • If "Aram and Israel attacked Judah" before "Yesha'ayhu came to speak with Achaz", how does R. Yigal Ariel understand the "נחה ארם על אפרים" report that the House of David received (Isaiah 7:2)? I would have thought that means the visit happened when they were still getting together, before they attacked Judah. – Tamir Evan Jun 11 at 15:38
  • @Tamir Evan . with regard to (Isaiah 7:2) according to Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible : "and the weakness of the king and people of Judah, who were like to trees shaken by the wind; and also the fear they were possessed with, partly through consciousness of guilt, and partly through distrust of divine power and Providence; and also on account of what they had suffered already from these powerful enemies, when they attacked them singly; and therefore might much more dread them, as they were combined together against them; see 2 Chronicles 28:5." – capri reds Jun 11 at 16:49
  • @caprireds I wasn't asking how Isaiah 7:2 could fit with the position that Isaiah's visit to Ahaz in Isaiah 7, happened after the events described in 2 Chronicles 28:5-15. For that, I could have gone with Malbim's commentary to Isaiah 7 (sorry, no online English translation), rather than John Gill's expositions. I was asking for R. Yigal Ariel's explanation, as his view is brought in the answer. – Tamir Evan Jun 13 at 2:57

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