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Shalom.

The following article from Chabad.org claims that one should ‘offer one’s back / cheek’ to no one but Hashem:

https://www.chabad.org/library/article_cdo/aid/1791975/jewish/Is-Turning-the-Other-Cheek-a-Jewish-Value.htm

This does seem to me to be a fair reading of Eicha 3:30, but it does not account for Yeshayahu 50:6-7, which specifically opposes the floggers, spitters and insulters to Hashem, Who upholds and protects the Navi in the face of these things.

It would therefore seem to me that ‘turning the other cheek’ is, in some circumstances, a Jewish value.

Have any recognised authorities endorsed this view, and, if so, have any said anything about whether one ought to solicit abuse and insult (or rebuke) in the case of an angry person (i.e. by asking them how one can improve)?

Thanks in advance.

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    There are at least two interpretors that I saw from a quick glance that explain those verses not as "one should offer their cheek", but rather as "even if one would be struck, that should not prevent them from serving God". See Ibn Ezra on 50:6, for one example. sefaria.org/Isaiah.50.6?with=Ibn%20Ezra&lang=bi – Salmononius2 Apr 15 at 12:56
  • @Salmononius2 - thanks for directing me to Sefaria; I should have checked these commentaries before posting. On the Ibn Ezra: I don’t quite follow his interpretation (as I don’t know Hebrew). Could someone explain? – Tom W Apr 15 at 13:11
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    Might be a settings thing, I didn't even look at the Hebrew for Ibn Ezra (I think it was Metzudas Tzion that said a similar idea, but only had Hebrew). It came up as English, this is their translation: "I gave my back, etc. I did not care that I had to expose my back to strokes for the sake of His name." – Salmononius2 Apr 15 at 14:43
  • @Salmononius2 - thanks. I’m happy with the explanation and would upvote (at the very least) if put in an answer :) – Tom W Apr 15 at 15:01
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    Well, who am I to say no to free Internet Points... :) Posted it below as an answer. – Salmononius2 Apr 15 at 15:05
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It's true, the plain definition of the verse in Isaiah 50:6 seems like it can be interpreted similar to the idea of "turn the other cheek":

גֵּוִי֙ נָתַ֣תִּי לְמַכִּ֔ים וּלְחָיַ֖י לְמֹֽרְטִ֑ים פָּנַי֙ לֹ֣א הִסְתַּ֔רְתִּי מִכְּלִמּ֖וֹת וָרֹֽק׃

I offered my back to the floggers, And my cheeks to those who tore out my hair. I did not hide my face From insult and spittle.

However, a few of the commentators explain it differently, not as "one should offer their cheek", but rather as "even if one would be struck, that should not prevent them from serving G-D".

See, for example, Ibn Ezra on that verse:

גוי וגו'. לא חששתי אם אני נתתי על שמו גוי למכים:

I gave my back, etc. I did not care that I had to expose my back to strokes for the sake of His name.

A quick glance seems to show that Metzudat David also explains the verse like this.

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