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Does the Hebrew word "Torah" originate from BOTH the words “Hora’ah” (meaning, Teaching) and “Orah” (meaning, Light)?

The accurate meaning of “Torah” is twofold. Firstly it comes from the word “hora’ah,” which means teaching .... The second ... is from the word “orah,” which means light.

This is the teaching from a rabbi https://www.aish.com/atr/What-is-Torah.html

But this rabbi does not reference his "answer from a reputable source", which is what I am looking for; that is, any source that is accepted here at miyodeya.

Here at miyodeya, there are a number of questions in regards to the meaning of the word "Torah"; such similar questions were not noted as duplicates, because of the various angles, in which it was asked; my hereby question is seeking an authoritative answer about the derivation of the Word "Torah" from BOTH “Hora’ah” (meaning, Teaching) and “Orah” (meaning, Light).

  • Duplicate of this (unanswered) question: judaism.stackexchange.com/questions/86752/orah-or-and-torah – Joel K Oct 14 at 9:33
  • @JoelK the difference is that I am giving this rabbi from AishHaTorah the benefit of a doubt that he is right and I am therefore 'seeking an authoritative answer about the derivation of the Word "Torah" from BOTH “Hora’ah” (meaning, Teaching) and “Orah” (meaning, Light).' In the "dupe" that you pointed-out, indeed, there are no answers there and at the same time, the comments do not give this rabbi from AishHaTorah the benefit of a doubt but go opposite his conclusion. – ninamag Oct 14 at 10:41
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    We should differentiate "meaning" from "interpretations", "origin" from "associations". 1. The fact that all words appear in the same text teaches that they did not originate one from another. 2. Why not "תור" - dove or "ירה" - shoot or "הרה" - pregnancy and many more? – Al Berko Oct 14 at 18:56
  • @AlBerko That may be so, but the rabbi in question used the word "meaning" or "means" three different times in the quote, when he wrote, 'The accurate meaning of “Torah” is twofold. Firstly it comes from the word “hora’ah,” which means teaching .... The second ... is from the word “orah,” which means light.' – ninamag Oct 14 at 19:01
  • I always say, don't mix facts and opinions. No Rabbi can claim to know facts about Hebrew etymology as we don't have such a tradition. – Al Berko Oct 14 at 19:05
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It's unclear what you consider to be a reputable source.

For the idea that Torah means and is associated with light, the Aish Rabbi cites Mishlei (Proverbs) 6:23

כִּ֤י נֵ֣ר מִ֭צְוָה וְת֣וֹרָה א֑וֹר וְדֶ֥רֶךְ חַ֝יִּ֗ים תּוֹכְח֥וֹת מוּסָֽר׃

which is Tanach. How much more reputable can you expect than the author of Mishlei, meaning King Solomon?

Concerning the second idea, that Torah is an expression of instruction (Hora'ah), there are many early sources for this teaching. Just one example is Chizkuni (one of the Rishonim) to Bereshit 26:5 which says:

ותורתי שאמרתי לו לך לך אל הארץ אשר אראך, וראיה לדבר אשכילך ואורך בדרך זו תלך. וכן יורנו בדרך יבחר וכן כל תורה לשון הוראה. ולפי הפשט מצותי חקותי הן שבע מצוות שנצטוו בני נח. ותורותי, “and My teachings;” this is a reference to the beginning of chapter 12 where G-d instructs Avraham to leave home and to proceed to a land that He will show him. As proof that this interpretation is correct, the author quotes Psalms 32,8: אשכילך ואורך בדרך זו, “Let me enlighten you and show you which way to go.” [The subject speaking in that verse is the Holy Spirit. (Alshich) He quotes a similar verse from Psalms 32,8. Whenever the word תורה occurs, it refers to teaching as a prelude to commanding the listener to conduct himself in accordance with it. As a result he claims that our verse taken together refers to the 7 universal laws that apply to all of mankind.

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