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I found that abroad (out of Israel) there is an intense usage of the word Chaplaincy. Does it mean Rabbanut in Hebrew? Are there Rabbis that call themselves Chaplaincy? Does this word come from Christianity? What is the definition and the role of Chaplaincy? Who can use it and where is it popular?

  • it is simply a generic term for someone who performs the function of clergy, often attached to a place of worship or other specific location. – rosends Jul 6 at 10:58
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    This is more of an English question than a Judaism question as the term is not specific to Judaism – robev Jul 6 at 12:37
  • @rosends A chaplain is normally attached to a specifically secular institution (e.g. military unit, hospital, prison, university) rather than a place of worship – Joel K Jul 6 at 12:43
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    @rosends That is certainly the etymology of the word. However, the way it is generally used today (especially when applied to rabbinic figures) is as I outlined i.e. that the place of worship to which the member of clergy is attached is connected to a secular institution. See e.g. here "He is currently Rabbi at Ealing United Synagogue and chaplain at both Heathrow Airport and at Northwick Park Hospital." – Joel K Jul 6 at 14:13
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From thefreedictionary.com

  1. A member of the clergy attached to a chapel.

  2. a. A member of the clergy who conducts religious services for an institution, such as a prison or hospital. b. A lay person who is appointed to provide spiritual leadership and counseling to members of an institution, as at a university. c. A member of the clergy who is connected with a royal court or an aristocratic household.

  3. A member of the clergy attached to a branch of the armed forces.

Generally I have had heard the word used for those that are a member of the clergy who conduct religious services for an institution, such as a prison or hospital.

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