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According to the halachot I am learning (Dirshu Halacha Yomi), "Therefore, the following people who are unable to bear in mind this intention, may not be involved in the matzah baking process: a non-Jew, a deaf-mute, a minor, and one who does not have full mental faculties."

This made me think about other people who may be unable to make matza.

The halacha from last week indicated that while forming the dough, the baker must look for certain signs, "These signs include; cracks forming on the dough or the color of the dough’s surface turning white" and they indicate that the dough is becoming chametz.

If an intrinsic aspect to making Matzah for the seder requires looking for visible signs, may a blind person be a baker of these matzot? And if not, is he included somewhere in a list of those not allowed?

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I've been making soft matzah for about 5 years and I can offer the following insights based on that experience.

The halacha from last week indicated that while forming the dough, the baker must look for certain signs, "These signs include; cracks forming on the dough or the color of the dough’s surface turning white" and they indicate that the dough is becoming chametz.

If one is making matzah in any of the traditional ways which includes Ashkenazi, Sepharadi, or Yemenite, there will never be an instance where one needs to check these visible signs. When the Gemara or Rambam or Shulchan Arukh discusses these visible signs, they are discussing the dough that has been left to sit after kneading. Here is an example of the dough being left to sit after kneading while waiting for there to be space on the oven to cook.

enter image description here

As long as someone as constantly working the dough, the physical signs of turning white or cracking will never happen. It's only during this waiting process that these signs can form, and they will still only form after a mil's walking time (which we rule is 18 minutes) which no one waits for anymore. Even in the above picture, each matza cooks in less than 1 minute, so all the dough that's waiting will be cooked well before 18 minutes.

Therefore I see no issues with a blind person making matzah as long as they make it according to the way that Jews traditionally make matzah.

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    Are you saying looking for visible signs is not an intrinsic aspect to making Matzah for the seder? How do you know this? Just because it's not a difficult task practically doesn't make it not intrinsic. – Double AA Mar 1 at 19:02

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