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For most Torah holidays, we keep two days outside Israel out of doubt.

Tu bishvat is a day with Biblical effects (though I wouldn't go so far as to say it's a Biblical "holiday", or a Rabbinic one either for that matter): it affects the Torah laws of maaser and orlah.

However, these laws are only in full force in Israel. Orlah applies mideoraisa everywhere due to a halacha lemoshe misinai, but is permitted outside Israel in a case of doubt, so it would probably be permitted on the 16th of Shevat. Maaser applies in a few places outside Israel, but in those places it's only Rabbinic, so I would guess that we would be lenient for the doubtful day (I may be wrong).

Are there any effects outside Israel of "the second day of Tu Bishvat"?

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  • 1
    Some possibilities, which I don't know the halacha well enough to confirm: if you carry a tree out of Israel in a flowerpot with holes in the bottom, making sure to stay over dirt the whole time? Or if you receive shipments of esrogim from Israel labeled "Picked on February 10, 2020" and "Picked on February 11, 2020"?
    – Heshy
    Commented Feb 11, 2020 at 14:12
  • 2
    NO TACHANUN!!!!!1!!!!!1!!
    – Double AA
    Commented Feb 11, 2020 at 14:15
  • 1
    @DoubleAA that's not my motivation for asking (though if the answer is yes I wouldn't be surprised if somebody used it as an excuse to make up another new day to not say tachanun)
    – Heshy
    Commented Feb 11, 2020 at 14:20
  • 1
    What about Revai? Fruit picked on 16 Shevat could be Safek Orlah / Safek Revai and therefore neither? Or maybe Podeh without Bracha? (accd to opinions revai exists in chul)
    – Double AA
    Commented Feb 11, 2020 at 14:21
  • 1
    What about in Syria? Safek Orlah is not as permitted there as in the rest of the diaspora and we know they didn't send messengers for Shevat so even in Syria they'd have had doubts?
    – Double AA
    Commented Feb 11, 2020 at 14:30

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