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Here they have Hebrew letters on the sides marking each verse. It starts at the beginning of the alphabet and seems to work its way up. I can't find any information on it though. Searching around results in Gematria. However, when I apply that function to my numbers I don't get the same output as that example text. How do I convert numbers to Hebrew representation like they do to number the verses?

That library produces this for numbers 1-20:

א׳
ב׳
ג׳
ד׳
ה׳
ו׳
ז׳
ח׳
ט׳
י׳
י״א
י״ב
י״ג
י״ד
ט״ו
ט״ז
י״ז
י״ח
י״ט

However, the example linked text uses this instead:

א
ב
ג
ד
ה
ו
...

How do they get those values? Is it hex encoded or something? Or how is it mapping to the numbers?

  • 2
    Can you clarify in what way gematria was lacking – Double AA Nov 5 at 2:46
  • 1
    I do not understand at all what the verse numbering has to do with Gematria, or where the gray shaded samples come from. The verse number is completely linear. Are you asking about the general Hebrew numerical numbering system? Because this is not specific to Torah verse numbering. – DanF Nov 5 at 2:49
  • I don’t think this is on-topic. This is a code formatting question, not one about the inherent system of Gematria. – DonielF Nov 5 at 2:58
  • @DonielF I'm going to VTC, but based on vagueness, not as an off-topic question. It would be better, perhaps, if the question specified how Torah verses are numbered using the Hebrew lettering. To me, that seems on-topic. – DanF Nov 5 at 3:27
  • I do not follow. The two examples that you use show the exact same numbering scheme. The first example show the numbers 1 through 19. The only difference is the apostrophe after each number. Yud followed by aleph is 10 + 1 = 11. The apostrophe is just a way of writing it. – sabbahillel Nov 5 at 11:20
2

I think you're asking how Hebrew letters relate to their numeric value. This is not unique to verse numbering but is used in numerous areas such as counting the days in the month.

View this site. It seems comprehensive.

  • Yeah this is exactly what I was talking about, thanks. – Lance Pollard Nov 5 at 3:58
2

As far as I can tell, those examples match each other exactly. The apostrophes in the Mechon Mamre text are simply convention for how to write Hebrew numbers (they signify that it's a shorthand or abbreviation rather than a word).

  • And, usually, the apostrophes / quotes precede the last letter in the numeric. In terms of using the numeric in the counting of the Hebrew year, which is, currently 5780, in Hebrew it is תש"פ which amount to 780. The millennial is implied. If we were to include that as part of the count, the mnemonic would be significantly longer. – DanF Nov 5 at 3:11
  • @DanF I think when the millennium is included it's usually written ה׳תש"פ – Daniel Nov 5 at 3:15
  • Correct. However, my comment implies that the millennium, generally, is excluded. – DanF Nov 5 at 3:20

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