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There are staunch anti-zionist factions such as (some of) Brisk and Satmar, Toldos Aaron, etc. that are diametrically opposed to the Zionist regime (referring to it as heretical and such). According to these groups (or similar groups) is making Aliyah (i.e becoming a citizen of the Zionist state) halachically forbidden?

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Yes. The Satmar Rav was in fact going to move to Israel after he escaped Europe, but saw the number of Gedolim there and felt he would be of more use elsewhere. The Griz moved to Israel and founded a Yeshiva of Brisk. Their opinions led them to hold that it is permitted to live in Israel, even a mitzvah, but is forbidden to have anything to do with the govt.

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    He didn't ask if it is permitted to live in Israel – Double AA Sep 5 at 11:57
  • The post is an answer, he says that there is a misva to live in Erets Israel but they think that it's prohibited to have an attachment to government. But there is no source. Personally I know a lot of Satmar and briskers and they're Israeli citizens with identity card. – kouty Sep 5 at 17:54
  • Please check that my edit matches your intent and re-edit otherwise. – msh210 Sep 5 at 18:13
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    @DoubleAA I agree with you per the current answer though maybe it can be argued that since by Israeli law (?) one must be naturalized in order to permanently live there then if any of those groups permitted “moving to Israel” they must’ve, ipso facto, permitted becoming a citizen. – Oliver Sep 5 at 18:20
  • I understand aliyah to move and live in Israel, citizen or no. I know many of these ppl are in fact citizens, and i also know they in fact move here and become citizens. They are supposed to not take part of governmental matters, and so far as i know do not vote or have interaction with the knesset. They are more than happy to take advantage of the socialist elements of the country though, like medicine. – user11308 Sep 6 at 12:22

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