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I'm asking this as a follow-up to this question.

Certain prayers such as tachanun are omitted when praying in a mourner's home. OU says that this is true even if the mourners are not present.

Rosends (OP on the linked question) and I came up with a few scenarios and were wondering if any of these would meet the definition of a "mourner's home", or rather, if there is a specific definition of criteria to qualify.

Scenarios:

  • The mourner began shiva somewhere outside the home that he owns but eventually returns to his home mid-shiva week. Is his home a mourner's home while he is not there?

  • Similar to above except the mourner starts in his home but goes elsewhere mid-shiva.

  • Is the guest's home considered a "mourner's home" only during the time mourners are there?

  • The mourner sits shiva in his home, goes to shul to daven, but will return. Say, while he is out, someone comes to visit and wants to daven in the physical house while he is out. Is it considered a "mourner's home"?

  • This one sounds unusual, but I have seen this happen:

A few years ago, one of my friends decided to sit shiva in the shul, because she didn't have enough room for visitors in her home. Is the shul considered a "mourner's home"? Note that normally, when a mourner attends a shul muinyan, the congregation does not follow the mourner's rules.

  • Other practices in a Beit Avel exist, such as covering mirrors (or overturning beds), Dayan HaEmet in Bentching, and not burning incense. – Double AA Jun 27 at 15:40
  • Conceptually this should parallel Even HaEzer 62:10. Where ever they are currently established as being based is their place. – Double AA Jun 27 at 15:47
  • @DoubleAA Would you mind summarizing some of its concepts and putting an answer? I wouldn't have even known where to look for something along this area. – DanF Jun 27 at 15:49

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