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As per the injunction of "לא תעמוד על דם רעך" - "Stand not [idly] over the blood of thine fellow"(Leviticus 19:16), is a Torah-observant doctor obligated to vaccinate an unvaccinated patient for a potentially deadly disease, even if that patient and/or that patient's parent/legal guardian is unwilling? Would the patient have the status of a rodef (pursuer) whom one is obligated to prevent from committing a murder, by inflicting an injury upon the pursuer?

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    I suspect that while anti-vaxxers are wildly incorrect and sinning by not vaccinating, it's probably too indirect to be technically considered a Rodef. Otherwise, just about anything could be stretched into Pikuach Nefesh (i.e. "I have to work on Shabbos, otherwise I might lose my job and not be able to pay my bills and become homeless and starve to death"). – Salmononius2 May 13 at 22:10
  • @Salmononius2 Over 500 American Rabbis came out shortly before Pesach signing a letter declaring vaccinating a chiyuv d’Oraisa. I don’t recall if they went so far as to declare them Rodfim, but certainly sinning. – DonielF May 13 at 22:37
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    Would the patient have the status of a rodef (pursuer) whom one is obligated to prevent from committing a murder, by inflicting an injury upon the pursuer? You ask for an ill person who is carrier of the virus? The Shut clearly does not address a problem of Rodef. But an ill contagious person can be considered as Rodef. e.g one is AIDS carrier an has intercourse with can be viewed as attempting to kill it and may be Rodef. – kouty May 14 at 1:20
  • @kouty [HIV carriers] – Kazi bácsi May 14 at 8:29
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    @AlBerko one obvious difference between this and exercising is that if you don't exercise you're only killing yourself, while if you don't vaccinate you're potentially infecting thousands of other people. – Heshy May 14 at 13:16

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