3

As an example, during Hol Hamo'ed Pesach, could you buy chametz online knowing that it will arrive after Pesach?

My assumption is that it would be OK, as the buyer doesn't actually own the product until it arrives at his home. Proof of that fact is that say, if you order from Amazon, they are responsible to replace the item if it has not arrived / got lost in transit.

Or, do we say that once someone has paid for the item, he owns it even if he has not physically acquired it?

  • Highly related: judaism.stackexchange.com/questions/103194/… – Josh K Apr 29 at 17:32
  • Do you mean acc. to Dina Demalchutah or by the Torah? – Al Berko Apr 29 at 18:46
  • 2
    I'm not completely sure your example sets the proof that you don't own it. Once the payment is cleared, you might be the owner, however, the condition of the purchase is that you can return it, or they can replace it. I answered it elsewhere about the return policy - are you already an owner or not. I think that the fact that you're not automatically refunded in many cases show that the ownership exists. – Al Berko Apr 29 at 18:48
  • Happy Omer, @Al. Re your first comment, I am mainly looking at it halachically - rabbinical or Torah-based. Dina Demalchuta might play a factor in the halachic ruling, here. – DanF Apr 29 at 19:39
  • 1
    "Proof of that fact is that say, if you order from Amazon, they are responsible to replace the item": They are? I'm unaware of such a law. Does that apply to all sellers? In all jurisdictions? I recommend that if you're asking only about such a case then you say so in the question. – msh210 Apr 29 at 20:48

You must log in to answer this question.

Browse other questions tagged .