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The end of the fourteenth chapter of mishnayos Y’vamos go through cases of two brothers’ marriages. The first cases are where both brothers, or both their wives, are deaf-mutes. Then come the following cases, in this order:

  • one brother is a deaf-mute and neither wife is, and the wives are sisters
  • one wife is a deaf-mute and neither husband is, and the wives are sisters
  • one brother and his wife are deaf-mutes, and the other wife is her sister and not a deaf-mute
  • one brother is a deaf-mute and neither wife is, and the wives are not sisters
  • one wife is a deaf-mute and neither husband is, and the wives are not sisters
  • one brother and his wife are deaf-mutes, and the other wife is not her sister and not a deaf-mute

Why doesn’t it also have the cases that one brother and the other’s wife are deaf-mutes (and the wives are sisters, or are not sisters)? That seems to be the one missing case.

  • 1
    Isn't that the case where everything is Derabanan? The Mishna only is figuring out how to handle Derabanan when there is also Deorayta aspects (IIRC) – Double AA Apr 23 '19 at 17:52
  • As @DoubleAA wrote, here his wife is Miderabanan, his Yebama comes from the strrenght of Nisuin derabanan, Both derabanan. Din pashut of Achot Isha as if all is deOrayta. – kouty Apr 23 '19 at 19:38
  • But the mishna deals with cases where everything is d'rabanan also. For example, where both brothers are deaf-mutes. – msh210 Apr 23 '19 at 22:11
  • I’m sure I’ve seen somewhere that this is אורחא דמילתא. If there are a חרש and חרשת and פקח and פקחת, we assume that they married their own “type”. But I can’t track down a source – Joel K Apr 24 '19 at 4:29

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