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While researching this question, I've bumped on Ketubah.com site that offers copies of Ketubahs of the Reform and Conservative branches in Judaism.

This is a sample text of a Reform Ketubah:

On the day of the week, on the day of the month of in the year 57XX corresponding to X day of the month of in the year 20XX here in XX the groom, said to the bride Be my wife by the consent of the Bet Din of according to the law of Moses and Israel. I will cherish and respect you and work for our mutual sustenance, living with you as your husband.”

The bride said to the groom Be my husband by the consent of the Bet Din of according to the law of Moses and Israel. I will cherish and respect you and work for our mutual sustenance, living with you as your wife.”

Bride and groom have promised to establish a Jewish home from this day forth. They have committed themselves to the covenant of marriage written this day between them. The symbolic acquisition by the groom and bride, with regard to everything written and explained above, has been performed. All herein written is valid and binding.

As this text mentions no financial obligations of the groom toward his bride, can this be called a Ketubah?

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