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What do these phrases mean, "come as one" and "teach a precedent"?

I think "come as one" means, they "are both the same" (?), but I am not sure this is the meaning of this in the phrase quoted below.

I think "teach a precedent" means "create a precedent"(?), but I am not sure this is the meaning of this in the phrase quoted below.

https://www.sefaria.org/Kiddushin.35a.1

The reason this is not a difficulty is because Torah study and the redemption of the firstborn son, from which women are also exempt, are two verses that come as one, and any two verses that come as one do not teach a precedent.

If somebody can point me to a webpage of halachic phrases, then perhaps I can find my answer there.

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The principle of “two verses that come as one do not teach [a precedent]” means the following:

In general, when the Torah teaches a law in a specific context, we assume that it is not limited to that context but applies generally.

This is referred to as a “binyan av” or “meh matzinu” and is one of the principles of Torah interpretation. It means that just as we find a law in situation X, that law applies in situations similar to X.

In the example given, had the Torah only taught a woman’s exemption in the context of a single positive, non-time bound commandment, like Torah study or the redemption of the firstborn son, we would have deduced that women are exempt from all such commandments.

The fact that the Torah needed to go out of its way in the context of multiple such commandments to teach the same law indicates that it is not a general rule but is specific to those commandments.

Hence, “two verses that come as one,” meaning two different verses dealing with the same type of commandment that come to teach me the same law, “do not teach,” meaning do not teach that this law is true generally for this type of commandment.

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‘Come as one’ here means two laws from which we could ostensibly derive the same principle, in this case, that women are exempt from positive non-time bound commandments.

‘Teach a precedent’, as you suggested, means create a precedent. So the fact that we have two cases where women are exempt from positive non-time bound commandments does not create a precedent for other commandments in the same category.

  • @Joel_K Thanks. Can you give an example of a commandment, where somebody might mistakenly "create a precedent" (using this situation) when in fact such should not be applied to that commandment? – ninamag Apr 12 at 13:58
  • As I alluded to in my answer, Torah study and Redemption of the Firstborn are two positive non-time bound commandments where women are exempt. On may have incorrectly drawn a precedent from here that women are exempt from all positive non-time bound commandments. – Joel K Apr 12 at 14:07

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