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What do our sources say about what happens the second you die. I’m pretty sure I heard somewhere that one’s soul comes out of their body and they float around the room. Are there any fascinating things that happen to one’s soul the moment they die or minutes after? Please cite sources.

  • read this: beta.hebrewbooks.org/… – Dr. Shmuel Apr 12 at 2:39
  • I've often heard that the neshama hangs around the body for a few days after death. I don't know the source for this, though. Honestly, mi yodeya? – ezra Apr 12 at 3:55
  • Shaare hqagmul from Ramban – kouty Apr 12 at 13:41
  • @Daniel "... things that happen to one’s soul the moment they die or minutes after?" We live in a world of time, therefore, after we die, there is no one-second after, one-minute after, one-hour after, etc., because death ushers into a world of no-time. As attested in the TaNaKH and the Talmud, I wrote in my answer about the two ultimate happenings. – ninamag Apr 15 at 8:19
  • @Dr.Shmuel please summarize your reading recommendation. – ninamag Apr 15 at 13:55
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'Surely the fate of human beings is like that of the animals; the same fate awaits them both: As one dies, so dies the other. All have the same breath; humans have no advantage over animals. Everything is meaningless. All go to the same place; all come from dust, and to dust all return. Who knows if the human spirit rises upward and if the spirit of the animal goes down into the earth?' Qohelet 3:19-

'For the living know that they will die, but the dead know nothing.' Qohelet 9:5a

'Whatever your hand finds to do, do it with all your might, for in the realm of the dead, where you are going, there is neither working nor planning nor knowledge nor wisdom. Qohelet 9:10

  • This is not really the way things are , A person does come from dust and returned to him, but only the physical body,Not for the soul that is eternal!!! – user19027 Apr 14 at 9:20
  • @Tahel The text (in bold) questions that. – Clifford Durousseau Apr 14 at 9:23
  • the meaning of the text in the bold by Rashi:Who knows - like "Who knows a settlement" (Joel 2:14) - He who understands that gives notice, that the spirit of human beings - is rising above the law, and the spirit of the animal - is descending to the land, and it can not be accountable. And we must not behave like a beast that does not care about its actions. – user19027 Apr 14 at 9:51
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    the dead know nothing-the meaning by Rashbam:Because life knows they will die, so they have to do Teshuvah while they are still alive. And the dead know nothing, and they can no longer repent and repent, and they will not have the reward and reward for the evil of their deeds, for their memory is forgotten. – user19027 Apr 14 at 10:09
  • The Bible should be read with any interpretation(!) because we are small and can not understand people who wrote it many years ago – user19027 Apr 14 at 10:13
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The exodus from the human body isnwt simple. At the time of the death itself, the soul sees the God.

In the Zohar ( זוהר פרשת ויחי ריח, עב) the Holy One is brought: The soul does not emerge from the body, until the Holy One, blessed be He, reveals itself to it.

The Holy Zohar says: At the moment of death, man is allowed to see the invisible and then he sees his relatives and friends who are already in the World to Come. They look to him as they looked in this world and he knows them and if he is worthy of the World to Come, they are happy.

In death, man moves to another world. True, the mind lacks the body, but it has a clear idea of ​​what is happening in the physical world. The person knows that he has died. For the first seven days after the death, the soul wanders back and forth from the house to the grave, and weeps over her body. In those days the Jews used the custom of mourning - to sit "Shiva" this sorrow of the soul is not physical pain. The soul mourns its physical veneer, just as a man mourns his ruined home.

By the way: Thirty days before the death, the soul begins to separate from the body and it is known that people with high spiritual sensitivity are able to notice the approach of this stage and feel that their death is approaching.

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Whether it happens one-second after we die, or one-minute after we die, or one-hour after we die, there are two ultimate destinations.

We live in a world of time, and after we die, we enter into a world of no-time. Therefore, after we die, there is no one-second after, there is no one-minute after, there is no one-hour after, etc....

From the TaNaKH and from the Talmud, we read about these ultimate destinations, inclusive of a time-frame:

"And many of them that sleep in the dust of the earth shall awake, some to everlasting life, and some to reproaches and everlasting abhorrence."

(Daniel 12:2)

Death is like sleep. Just as we wake-up from sleep, we also wake-up from death.

Yochanan Ben-Zakkai said, "I have two paths before me, one of the Garden of Eden and one of Gehenna, and I do not know on which they are leading me;"

(www.sefaria.org/Berakhot.28b)

Dying is like walking, a continuous process of being, and therefore upon death (upon the continuous process of being), we encounter a fork on the road, one fork leads to Gan-Eden, and the other to Gehenna.

Master of the Universe, You have judged properly, You have acquitted properly, You have condemned properly, and it is befitting that You have prepared Gehenna for the wicked and the Garden of Eden for the righteous.

(www.sefaria.org/Eruvin.19a)

This quote, from the Talmud, tells us the courtroom time-frame after death, there is judgment ("You have judged properly"), which either leads to acquittal ("You have acquitted properly") or condemnation ("You have condemned properly"). A sentence of condemnation condemns one into the hellish "Gehenna"-Destination, whereas an acquittal leads into the heavenly "Garden of Eden"-Destination.

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