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Not really comparable - in your scenario there's an official shul price list which the gabbai knows about and is expected to follow. But most of the time there's a range of prices within a geographical area; does every grocery store in your neighborhood sell bread at exactly the same price, for example? So if you go to one store where a loaf of bread is $2.99, and then later to another store where you can get it for $2.50, you're usually not going to go and return the bread to the first store in order to save 49 cents - it's not worth the trouble. That's mechilah. (At most, you'll start shopping at the second store from now on.)

See Tur Choshen Mishpat 227:

וכתב א"א הרא"ש ז"ל... אלא שחכמים אמרו עד שתות הוי מחילה לפי שכן הוא דרך מקח וממכר שאין הלוקח והמוכר יכולין לכוין דמי המקח בצמצום ודרך העולם למחול טעות עד שתות

The Rosh writes that the Chachamim said that there's mechilah up to 1/6 because this is the normal way of commerce, that the buyer and seller can't establish the value of the item with such precision, and so people typically forgo an error of up to 1/6.

So we're explicitly not talking about a case where there's a fixed price, but one where the price fluctuates within some reasonable range.

Not really comparable - in your scenario there's an official shul price list which the gabbai knows about and is expected to follow. But most of the time there's a range of prices within a geographical area; does every grocery store in your neighborhood sell bread at exactly the same price, for example? So if you go to one store where a loaf of bread is $2.99, and then later to another store where you can get it for $2.50, you're usually not going to go and return the bread to the first store in order to save 49 cents - it's not worth the trouble. That's mechilah. (At most, you'll start shopping at the second store from now on.)

Not really comparable - in your scenario there's an official shul price list which the gabbai knows about and is expected to follow. But most of the time there's a range of prices within a geographical area; does every grocery store in your neighborhood sell bread at exactly the same price, for example? So if you go to one store where a loaf of bread is $2.99, and then later to another store where you can get it for $2.50, you're usually not going to go and return the bread to the first store in order to save 49 cents - it's not worth the trouble. That's mechilah. (At most, you'll start shopping at the second store from now on.)

See Tur Choshen Mishpat 227:

וכתב א"א הרא"ש ז"ל... אלא שחכמים אמרו עד שתות הוי מחילה לפי שכן הוא דרך מקח וממכר שאין הלוקח והמוכר יכולין לכוין דמי המקח בצמצום ודרך העולם למחול טעות עד שתות

The Rosh writes that the Chachamim said that there's mechilah up to 1/6 because this is the normal way of commerce, that the buyer and seller can't establish the value of the item with such precision, and so people typically forgo an error of up to 1/6.

So we're explicitly not talking about a case where there's a fixed price, but one where the price fluctuates within some reasonable range.

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Not really comparable - in your scenario there's an official shul price list which the gabbai knows about and is expected to follow. But most of the time there's a range of prices within a geographical area; does every grocery store in your neighborhood sell bread at exactly the same price, for example? So if you go to one store where a loaf of bread is $2.99, and then later to another store where you can get it for $2.50, you're usually not going to go and return the bread to the first store in order to save 49 cents - it's not worth the trouble. That's mechilah. (At most, you'll start shopping at the second store from now on.)