2 Wrong word.
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One possibility is that the verses in Chapter 29 are not in precise chronological order, and verse 31 actually took place before verse 28. That is to say that God saw that Leah was hated and opened her womb before Yaakov married Rachel. As for why the verse would be placed out of order, we could explain simply that it would have been too disruptive to the narrative if placed in its proper chronological place.

Consider that immediately after this, in verse 32, the Torah states that Leah gave birth to Reuven. The next verses after that list the births of Leah's next three sons. If the Torah would have followed the chronological order it would have to tell us that God saw that Leah was hated and opened her womb, and then interrupt with six verses about marrying Rachel as well, and then return to the narrative of Leah giving birth. Instead, it makes sense to get the part about marrying Rachel out of the way, and then go straight through the narrative of Leah becoming pregnant and giving birth to four kindskids.

In fact, R. Yaakov Ben Asher states explicitly in his commentary to verse 31 that it is referencing an earlier event, and he ties this to what the Torah says in 49:3:

וצריך לפרש שראה קודם נישואיה שהיא שנואה ופתח רחמה ונתעברה בביאה ראשונה כדכתיב גבי ראובן ראשית אוני שנולד מטיפה ראשונה

And we have to explain that He saw before her marriage that she was hated, and he opened her womb and she became pregnant with the first intercourse, as it is written by Reuven "the first of my power" — that he was born from the first drop.

Since part of the key line does not appear in some editions, here is an image:

Page from commentary

A similar interpretation is given by R. Yitzchak Ben Yehuda in his commentary to verse 31.

One possibility is that the verses in Chapter 29 are not in precise chronological order, and verse 31 actually took place before verse 28. That is to say that God saw that Leah was hated and opened her womb before Yaakov married Rachel. As for why the verse would be placed out of order, we could explain simply that it would have been too disruptive to the narrative if placed in its proper chronological place.

Consider that immediately after this, in verse 32, the Torah states that Leah gave birth to Reuven. The next verses after that list the births of Leah's next three sons. If the Torah would have followed the chronological order it would have to tell us that God saw that Leah was hated and opened her womb, and then interrupt with six verses about marrying Rachel as well, and then return to the narrative of Leah giving birth. Instead, it makes sense to get the part about marrying Rachel out of the way, and then go straight through the narrative of Leah becoming pregnant and giving birth to four kinds.

In fact, R. Yaakov Ben Asher states explicitly in his commentary to verse 31 that it is referencing an earlier event, and he ties this to what the Torah says in 49:3:

וצריך לפרש שראה קודם נישואיה שהיא שנואה ופתח רחמה ונתעברה בביאה ראשונה כדכתיב גבי ראובן ראשית אוני שנולד מטיפה ראשונה

And we have to explain that He saw before her marriage that she was hated, and he opened her womb and she became pregnant with the first intercourse, as it is written by Reuven "the first of my power" — that he was born from the first drop.

Since part of the key line does not appear in some editions, here is an image:

Page from commentary

A similar interpretation is given by R. Yitzchak Ben Yehuda in his commentary to verse 31.

One possibility is that the verses in Chapter 29 are not in precise chronological order, and verse 31 actually took place before verse 28. That is to say that God saw that Leah was hated and opened her womb before Yaakov married Rachel. As for why the verse would be placed out of order, we could explain simply that it would have been too disruptive to the narrative if placed in its proper chronological place.

Consider that immediately after this, in verse 32, the Torah states that Leah gave birth to Reuven. The next verses after that list the births of Leah's next three sons. If the Torah would have followed the chronological order it would have to tell us that God saw that Leah was hated and opened her womb, and then interrupt with six verses about marrying Rachel as well, and then return to the narrative of Leah giving birth. Instead, it makes sense to get the part about marrying Rachel out of the way, and then go straight through the narrative of Leah becoming pregnant and giving birth to four kids.

In fact, R. Yaakov Ben Asher states explicitly in his commentary to verse 31 that it is referencing an earlier event, and he ties this to what the Torah says in 49:3:

וצריך לפרש שראה קודם נישואיה שהיא שנואה ופתח רחמה ונתעברה בביאה ראשונה כדכתיב גבי ראובן ראשית אוני שנולד מטיפה ראשונה

And we have to explain that He saw before her marriage that she was hated, and he opened her womb and she became pregnant with the first intercourse, as it is written by Reuven "the first of my power" — that he was born from the first drop.

Since part of the key line does not appear in some editions, here is an image:

Page from commentary

A similar interpretation is given by R. Yitzchak Ben Yehuda in his commentary to verse 31.

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One possibility is that the verses in Chapter 29 are not in precise chronological order, and verse 31 actually took place before verse 28. That is to say that God saw that Leah was hated and opened her womb before Yaakov married Rachel. As for why the verse would be placed out of order, we could explain simply that it would have been too disruptive to the narrative if placed in its proper chronological place.

Consider that immediately after this, in verse 32, the Torah states that Leah gave birth to Reuven. The next verses after that list the births of Leah's next three sons. If the Torah would have followed the chronological order it would have to tell us that God saw that Leah was hated and opened her womb, and then interrupt with six verses about marrying Rachel as well, and then return to the narrative of Leah giving birth. Instead, it makes sense to get the part about marrying Rachel out of the way, and then go straight through the narrative of Leah becoming pregnant and giving birth to four kinds.

In fact, R. Yaakov Ben Asher states explicitly in his commentary to verse 31 that it is referencing an earlier event, and he ties this to what the Torah says in 49:3:

וצריך לפרש שראה קודם נישואיה שהיא שנואה ופתח רחמה ונתעברה בביאה ראשונה כדכתיב גבי ראובן ראשית אוני שנולד מטיפה ראשונה

And we have to explain that He saw before her marriage that she was hated, and he opened her womb and she became pregnant with the first intercourse, as it is written by Reuven "the first of my power" — that he was born from the first drop.

Since part of the key line does not appear in some editions, here is an image:

Page from commentary

A similar interpretation is given by R. Yitzchak Ben Yehuda in his commentary to verse 31.