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In a case where the wording could embarrass the bride or groom (for example, it mentions a previous marriage that the public is unaware of, or states that one is a convert and they wish to conceal thisthis; similarly in the case where the bride or groom's true name might cause fights), the Rabbis permit reading the standard text instead of the real text.

Clearly it is not strictly necessary to read the actual text of the Ketubah under the Chuppah. It would not invalidate the wedding in any way.

However, it remains proper for the groom to know the meaning of the Ketubah. One ought not to sign a contract without knowing its contents!

In a case where the wording could embarrass the bride or groom (for example, it mentions a previous marriage that the public is unaware of, or states that one is a convert and they wish to conceal this), the Rabbis permit reading the standard text instead of the real text.

Clearly it is not strictly necessary to read the actual text of the Ketubah under the Chuppah. It would not invalidate the wedding in any way.

However, it remains proper for the groom to know the meaning of the Ketubah. One ought not to sign a contract without knowing its contents!

In a case where the wording could embarrass the bride or groom (for example, it mentions a previous marriage that the public is unaware of, or states that one is a convert and they wish to conceal this; similarly in the case where the bride or groom's true name might cause fights), the Rabbis permit reading the standard text instead of the real text.

Clearly it is not strictly necessary to read the actual text of the Ketubah under the Chuppah. It would not invalidate the wedding in any way.

However, it remains proper for the groom to know the meaning of the Ketubah. One ought not to sign a contract without knowing its contents!

1
source | link

In a case where the wording could embarrass the bride or groom (for example, it mentions a previous marriage that the public is unaware of, or states that one is a convert and they wish to conceal this), the Rabbis permit reading the standard text instead of the real text.

Clearly it is not strictly necessary to read the actual text of the Ketubah under the Chuppah. It would not invalidate the wedding in any way.

However, it remains proper for the groom to know the meaning of the Ketubah. One ought not to sign a contract without knowing its contents!