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There's something called the Serenity Prayer, which is a clever "prayer" often used at addiction support groups, such as AA.

I did a little Googling, and it turns out that it may have been composed by an Evangelical minister in Massachusetts in the 1930s. (Wikipedia) There's more to it, but the commonly known part goes like this:

God grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, the courage to change the things I can, and wisdom to know the difference.

I ran it through Google translate and got the following:

אלוהים תן לי את השלווה לקבל את הדברים שאני לא יכול לשנות, את
את האומץ לשנות את הדברים שאני יכול, וחוכמה
וחוכמה לדעת את ההבדל.

Is there something idiomatically equivalent in Judaism? The next paragraph of the prayer directly references the human in their belief system, so I'm looking for an expression of the same idea, but from an Orthodox Jewish perspective.

There's something called the Serenity Prayer, which is a clever "prayer" often used at addiction support groups, such as AA.

I did a little Googling, and it turns out that it may have been composed by an Evangelical minister in Massachusetts in the 1930s. (Wikipedia) There's more to it, but the commonly known part goes like this:

God grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, the courage to change the things I can, and wisdom to know the difference.

I ran it through Google translate and got the following:

אלוהים תן לי את השלווה לקבל את הדברים שאני לא יכול לשנות, את האומץ לשנות את הדברים שאני יכול, וחוכמה לדעת את ההבדל.

Is there something idiomatically equivalent in Judaism? The next paragraph of the prayer directly references the human in their belief system, so I'm looking for an expression of the same idea, but from an Orthodox Jewish perspective.

There's something called the Serenity Prayer, which is a clever "prayer" often used at addiction support groups, such as AA.

I did a little Googling, and it turns out that it may have been composed by an Evangelical minister in Massachusetts in the 1930s. (Wikipedia) There's more to it, but the commonly known part goes like this:

God grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, the courage to change the things I can, and wisdom to know the difference.

I ran it through Google translate and got the following:

אלוהים תן לי את השלווה לקבל את הדברים שאני לא יכול לשנות
את האומץ לשנות את הדברים שאני יכול
וחוכמה לדעת את ההבדל

Is there something idiomatically equivalent in Judaism? The next paragraph of the prayer directly references the human in their belief system, so I'm looking for an expression of the same idea, but from an Orthodox Jewish perspective.

2 deleted 68 characters in body; edited tags
source | link

There's something called the Serenity Prayer, which is a clever "prayer" often used at addiction support groups, such as AA.

I did a little Googling, and it turns out that it may have been composed by an Evangelical minister in Massachusetts in the 1930s. (Wikipedia) There's more to it, but the commonly known part goes like this:

God grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, the courage to change the things I can, and wisdom to know the difference.

I've seen magnets and wallpapers of the quote around, and it's really clever. But I did a little Googling, (I was about to print it and hang it over my desk) and it turns out that it may have been composed by an Evangelical minister in Massachussets in the 1930s. (Wikipedia)

I ran it through Google translate and got the following:

אלוהים תן לי את השלווה לקבל את הדברים שאני לא יכול לשנות, את האומץ לשנות את הדברים שאני יכול, וחוכמה לדעת את ההבדל.

Is there something idiomatically equivalent in Judaism? The next paragraph of the prayer directly references the human in their belief system, so I'm looking for an expression of the same idea, but from an Orthodox Jewish perspective.

There's something called the Serenity Prayer, which is a clever "prayer" often used at addiction support groups, such as AA.

God grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, the courage to change the things I can, and wisdom to know the difference.

I've seen magnets and wallpapers of the quote around, and it's really clever. But I did a little Googling, (I was about to print it and hang it over my desk) and it turns out that it may have been composed by an Evangelical minister in Massachussets in the 1930s. (Wikipedia)

I ran it through Google translate and got the following:

אלוהים תן לי את השלווה לקבל את הדברים שאני לא יכול לשנות, את האומץ לשנות את הדברים שאני יכול, וחוכמה לדעת את ההבדל.

Is there something idiomatically equivalent in Judaism? The next paragraph of the prayer directly references the human in their belief system, so I'm looking for an expression of the same idea, but from an Orthodox Jewish perspective.

There's something called the Serenity Prayer, which is a clever "prayer" often used at addiction support groups, such as AA.

I did a little Googling, and it turns out that it may have been composed by an Evangelical minister in Massachusetts in the 1930s. (Wikipedia) There's more to it, but the commonly known part goes like this:

God grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, the courage to change the things I can, and wisdom to know the difference.

I ran it through Google translate and got the following:

אלוהים תן לי את השלווה לקבל את הדברים שאני לא יכול לשנות, את האומץ לשנות את הדברים שאני יכול, וחוכמה לדעת את ההבדל.

Is there something idiomatically equivalent in Judaism? The next paragraph of the prayer directly references the human in their belief system, so I'm looking for an expression of the same idea, but from an Orthodox Jewish perspective.

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