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These lamps were to be ignited before Shabbos began and because of Jewish law, they could not be extinguished by man before Hawdoleh. This clearly means that they burnt during the evening and during the night before they extinguished by themselves during the day of Shabbos. It could not have been otherwise.

I have three of them :-), one was made by 1700 in central Europe (length about 60 centimetres, it could have been in a Yeschiweh, it's huge!, a merchant found it in a barn in Alsace, apparently it has been stolen by the invading Germans in WW2 or it has been hidden before), and I have a much shorter one from 1850-1880 which I bought from Aschkenasim in Israel, and then I have an other long one from France. It's from the early 19th century from the region of Tourraine. In 1791, the French national assembly invited the Jews to come to France again (they had been expelled in 1394), and everywhere a Shul etc needed new Shabbos Lamps, so they built the same type of the baroque lamps from the two centuries before, but they added some arms for regular candles. This type was quite common amongst Jews during the 18hundreds.

Some days ago I found an other Shabbos Lamp. It's short, about 30 cm, and it has a double eagle on top (this is the symbol for the Byzantine empire for and the for German empire from 1356 to 1806 (this lamp is already the baroque type). It seems to be from 1650 - 1680, the oldest one I've ever seen apart from that ulta rare one in New York from 1330 of course.

If there are questions, please feel free to ask.

These lamps were to be ignited before Shabbos began and because of Jewish law, they could not be extinguished by man before Hawdoleh. This clearly means that they burnt during the evening and during the night before they extinguished by themselves during the day of Shabbos. It could not have been otherwise.

I have three of them :-), one was made by 1700 in central Europe (length about 60 centimetres, it could have been in a Yeschiweh, it's huge!, a merchant found it in a barn in Alsace, apparently it has been stolen by the invading Germans in WW2 or it has been hidden before), and I have a much shorter one from 1850-1880 which I bought from Aschkenasim in Israel, and then I have an other long one from France. It's from the early 19th century from the region of Tourraine. In 1791, the French national assembly invited the Jews to come to France again (they had been expelled in 1394), and everywhere a Shul etc needed new Shabbos Lamps, so they built the same type of the baroque lamps from the two centuries before, but they added some arms for regular candles. This type was quite common amongst Jews during the 18hundreds.

Some days ago I found an other Shabbos Lamp. It's short, about 30 cm, and it has a double eagle on top (this is the symbol for the Byzantine empire for and the German empire from 1356 to 1806 (this lamp is already the baroque type). It seems to be from 1650 - 1680, the oldest one I've ever seen apart from that ulta rare one in New York from 1330 of course.

If there are questions, please feel free to ask.

These lamps were to be ignited before Shabbos began and because of Jewish law, they could not be extinguished by man before Hawdoleh. This clearly means that they burnt during the evening and during the night before they extinguished by themselves during the day of Shabbos. It could not have been otherwise.

I have three of them :-), one was made by 1700 in central Europe (length about 60 centimetres, it could have been in a Yeschiweh, it's huge!, a merchant found it in a barn in Alsace, apparently it has been stolen by the invading Germans in WW2 or it has been hidden before), and I have a much shorter one from 1850-1880 which I bought from Aschkenasim in Israel, and then I have an other long one from France. It's from the early 19th century from the region of Tourraine. In 1791, the French national assembly invited the Jews to come to France again (they had been expelled in 1394), and everywhere a Shul etc needed new Shabbos Lamps, so they built the same type of the baroque lamps from the two centuries before, but they added some arms for regular candles. This type was quite common amongst Jews during the 18hundreds.

Some days ago I found an other Shabbos Lamp. It's short, about 30 cm, and it has a double eagle on top (this is the symbol for the Byzantine empire and the for German empire from 1356 to 1806 (this lamp is already the baroque type). It seems to be from 1650 - 1680, the oldest one I've ever seen apart from that ulta rare one in New York from 1330 of course.

If there are questions, please feel free to ask.

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These lamps were to be ignited before Shabbos began and because of Jewish law, they could not be extinguished by man before Hawdoleh. This clearly means that they burnt during the evening and during the night before they extinguished by themselves during the day of Shabbos. It could not have been otherwise.

I have three of them :-), one was made by 1700 in central Europe (length about 60 centimetres, it could have been in a Yeschiweh, it's huge!, a merchant found it in a barn in Alsace, apparently it has been stolen by the invading Germans in WW2 or it has been hidden before), and I have a much shorter one from 1850-1880 which I bought from Aschkenasim in Israel, and then I have an other long one from France. It's from the early 19th century from the region of Tourraine. In 1791, the French national assembly invited the Jews to come to France again (they had been expelled in 1394), and everywhere a Shul etc needed new Shabbos Lamps, so they built the same type of the baroque lamps from the two centuries before, but they added some arms for regular candles. This type was quite common amongst Jews during the 18hundreds.

Some days ago I found an other Shabbos Lamp. It's short, about 30 cm, and it has a double eagle on top (this is the symbol for the Byzantine empire for and the German empire from 1356 to 1806 (this lamp is already the baroque type). It seems to be from 1650 - 1680, the oldest one I've ever seen apart from that ulta rare one in New York from 1330 of course.

If there are questions, please feel free to ask.