4 more specific title
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Hashem Elokim אדנ-י יהו-ה - Significance to thethese two names of God used together?

3 remove ref to genesis
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In many places in Tanach, God is referred to as אדנ-י יהו-ה.

For example: David's speech in Shmuel II, 7:18-29 includes seven such references, and Chapter 2 of Genesis includes twelve. 

What is the significance for God being addressed in this way? What does the combination of these specific names of God teach us when they are combined in this way?

In many places in Tanach, God is referred to as אדנ-י יהו-ה.

For example: David's speech in Shmuel II, 7:18-29 includes seven such references, and Chapter 2 of Genesis includes twelve.

What is the significance for God being addressed in this way? What does the combination of these specific names of God teach us when they are combined in this way?

In many places in Tanach, God is referred to as אדנ-י יהו-ה.

For example: David's speech in Shmuel II, 7:18-29 includes seven such references. 

What is the significance for God being addressed in this way? What does the combination of these specific names of God teach us when they are combined in this way?

2 made question more general, spun off second question
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In many places in Tanach, God is referred to as אדנ-י יהו-ה.

For example: David's speech in Shmuel II, 7:18-29, David addresses God includes seven times as אדנ-י יהו-הsuch references, and Chapter 2 of Genesis includes twelve.  

What is the significance for God being addressed in this seemingly redundant way, both in this instance (and in general, if a general explanation is possible)? (Obviously it is not really redundant, butWhat does the use of two consecutive appellations for God, bothcombination of which are pronounced the same way, could lead one to that conclusion.)

And what is the source for the custom to not pronounce these two words asspecific names of God teach us when they normally are pronounced, but rather to pronounce them as Adonai Elohimcombined in this way?

In David's speech in Shmuel II, 7:18-29, David addresses God seven times as אדנ-י יהו-ה.  

What is the significance for God being addressed in this seemingly redundant way, both in this instance (and in general, if a general explanation is possible)? (Obviously it is not really redundant, but the use of two consecutive appellations for God, both of which are pronounced the same way, could lead one to that conclusion.)

And what is the source for the custom to not pronounce these two words as they normally are pronounced, but rather to pronounce them as Adonai Elohim?

In many places in Tanach, God is referred to as אדנ-י יהו-ה.

For example: David's speech in Shmuel II, 7:18-29 includes seven such references, and Chapter 2 of Genesis includes twelve.

What is the significance for God being addressed in this way? What does the combination of these specific names of God teach us when they are combined in this way?

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