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Why does the Midrash single out these names?

Shir HaShirim Rabbah 2:13, expounding Shir HaShirim 2:4 (ודגלו עלי אהבה, literally translated as "his banner is beloved upon me"):

אמר רבי יששכר תינוק שקרא למֹשה מַשה לאהרֹן אהרַן לעפרֹן עפרַן אמר הקב״ה וליגלוגו עלי אהבה

Says R' Yissachar, a child who reads Moshe [as] "Masheh," Aharon [as] "Aharan," Ephron [as] "Ephran," Hashem says of him, "His mispronunciation (ליגלוגו) is beloved upon me."

If he just picked on one random name to botch up, I'd say he was just picking a random name. But he says three names. Seemingly the only common denominator between them is that they all have a cholom that's being pronounced as a patach. However, there are other such names - say, Yaakov being pronounced as Yaakav. Is there something unique about these three names that R' Yissachar picks them out to botch them up?