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The Ben Ish Chai (in Torah Lishmah) says that there are two reasons why we pray for someone ben his mother:

  1. Women have less sins (they don't have the commandment to learn Torah constantly, which is a sin that everyone violates to some degree every single day.)
  2. We know for a fact who is the mother, while not 100% for sure who is the father.

According to the first reason, we could say a mishebeirach after either (the 7 commandments are not time-related, and obligatory on both men and women equally). According to the second reason, even by a non-jew one should say a mishebeirach after the mother.

R' Zevin (A Treasury of Chassidic Tales) wrote that when Count Dravski went to the grave of R' Menachem Mendel of Rimanov he wrote a Pidyon Nefesh and he signed it as "Miechislav Dravski the son of Victoria".

Though hodofhod pointed out that chabad.orgchabad.org says a non-jew should use the father's name when writing a Pidyon Nefesh by the grave of a tzaddik.

The Ben Ish Chai (in Torah Lishmah) says that there are two reasons why we pray for someone ben his mother:

  1. Women have less sins (they don't have the commandment to learn Torah constantly, which is a sin that everyone violates to some degree every single day.)
  2. We know for a fact who is the mother, while not 100% for sure who is the father.

According to the first reason, we could say a mishebeirach after either (the 7 commandments are not time-related, and obligatory on both men and women equally). According to the second reason, even by a non-jew one should say a mishebeirach after the mother.

R' Zevin (A Treasury of Chassidic Tales) wrote that when Count Dravski went to the grave of R' Menachem Mendel of Rimanov he wrote a Pidyon Nefesh and he signed it as "Miechislav Dravski the son of Victoria".

Though hodofhod pointed out that chabad.org says a non-jew should use the father's name when writing a Pidyon Nefesh by the grave of a tzaddik.

The Ben Ish Chai (in Torah Lishmah) says that there are two reasons why we pray for someone ben his mother:

  1. Women have less sins (they don't have the commandment to learn Torah constantly, which is a sin that everyone violates to some degree every single day.)
  2. We know for a fact who is the mother, while not 100% for sure who is the father.

According to the first reason, we could say a mishebeirach after either (the 7 commandments are not time-related, and obligatory on both men and women equally). According to the second reason, even by a non-jew one should say a mishebeirach after the mother.

R' Zevin (A Treasury of Chassidic Tales) wrote that when Count Dravski went to the grave of R' Menachem Mendel of Rimanov he wrote a Pidyon Nefesh and he signed it as "Miechislav Dravski the son of Victoria".

Though hodofhod pointed out that chabad.org says a non-jew should use the father's name when writing a Pidyon Nefesh by the grave of a tzaddik.

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ThereThe Ben Ish Chai (in Torah Lishmah) says that there are two reasons why we pray for someone ben his mother:

  1. Women have less sins (they don't have the commandment to learn Torah constantly, which is a sin that everyone violates to some degree every single day.)
  2. We know for a fact who is the mother, while not 100% for sure who is the father.

1) Women have less sins (they don't have the commandment to learn Torah constantly, which is a sin that everyone violatesAccording to some degree every single day.) 2) We know for a fact who is the motherfirst reason, while not 100% for sure who is the father. we could say a mishebeirach after either (Source: Torah Lishma from the Ben Ish Chaithe 7 commandments are not time-related, and obligatory on both men and women equally)

So according. According to the firstsecond reason it shouldn't make a difference, even by a non-jew to be namedone should say a mishebeirach after the mother or the father.

R' Zevin (the 7 commandments apply equallyA Treasury of Chassidic Tales) wrote that when Count Dravski went to both menthe grave of R' Menachem Mendel of Rimanov he wrote a Pidyon Nefesh and women), thoughhe signed it as "Miechislav Dravski the second reason still appliesson of Victoria".

Though hodofhod pointed out that chabad.org says a non-jew should use the father's name when writing a Pidyon Nefesh by the grave of a tzaddik.

There are two reasons why we pray for someone ben his mother:

1) Women have less sins (they don't have the commandment to learn Torah constantly, which is a sin that everyone violates to some degree every single day.) 2) We know for a fact who is the mother, while not 100% for sure who is the father. (Source: Torah Lishma from the Ben Ish Chai)

So according to the first reason it shouldn't make a difference by a non-jew to be named after the mother or the father(the 7 commandments apply equally to both men and women), though the second reason still applies.

The Ben Ish Chai (in Torah Lishmah) says that there are two reasons why we pray for someone ben his mother:

  1. Women have less sins (they don't have the commandment to learn Torah constantly, which is a sin that everyone violates to some degree every single day.)
  2. We know for a fact who is the mother, while not 100% for sure who is the father.

According to the first reason, we could say a mishebeirach after either (the 7 commandments are not time-related, and obligatory on both men and women equally). According to the second reason, even by a non-jew one should say a mishebeirach after the mother.

R' Zevin (A Treasury of Chassidic Tales) wrote that when Count Dravski went to the grave of R' Menachem Mendel of Rimanov he wrote a Pidyon Nefesh and he signed it as "Miechislav Dravski the son of Victoria".

Though hodofhod pointed out that chabad.org says a non-jew should use the father's name when writing a Pidyon Nefesh by the grave of a tzaddik.

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There are two reasons why we pray for someone ben his mother:

1) Women have less sins (they don't have the commandment to learn Torah constantly, which is a sin that everyone violates to some degree every single day.) 2) We know for a fact who is the mother, while not 100% for sure who is the father. (Source: Torah Lishma from the Ben Ish Chai)

So according to the first reason it shouldn't make a difference by a non-jew to be named after the mother or the father(the 7 commandments apply equally to both men and women), though the second reason still applies.