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Literally it means "investigation" or something similar (and is used in other contexts, like that of evidence in court), but it's used to mean "hair-splitting".

Yes, really.

Well, almost really. A chakira is an investigation as to the exact nature of something, and is usually stated as a binary choice: is X an A or is X a B? (X can be an object, a state, an action, etc.) A practical difference is generally sought so that the distinction is clear and known to be real, and, where possible, proof is brought as to whether X is in fact an A or a B.

It's popular in the writings of the rabbis Soloveitchik and their students.

It's useful becausein that it clarifies the nature of X.

Literally it means "investigation" or something similar (and is used in other contexts, like that of evidence in court), but it's used to mean "hair-splitting".

Yes, really.

Well, almost really. A chakira is an investigation as to the exact nature of something, and is usually stated as a binary choice: is X an A or is X a B? (X can be an object, a state, an action, etc.) A practical difference is generally sought so that the distinction is clear and known to be real, and, where possible, proof is brought as to whether X is in fact an A or a B.

It's popular in the writings of the rabbis Soloveitchik and their students.

It's useful because it clarifies the nature of X.

Literally it means "investigation" or something similar (and is used in other contexts, like that of evidence in court), but it's used to mean "hair-splitting".

Yes, really.

Well, almost really. A chakira is an investigation as to the exact nature of something, and is usually stated as a binary choice: is X an A or is X a B? (X can be an object, a state, an action, etc.) A practical difference is generally sought so that the distinction is clear and known to be real, and, where possible, proof is brought as to whether X is in fact an A or a B.

It's popular in the writings of the rabbis Soloveitchik and their students.

It's useful in that it clarifies the nature of X.

1
source | link

Literally it means "investigation" or something similar (and is used in other contexts, like that of evidence in court), but it's used to mean "hair-splitting".

Yes, really.

Well, almost really. A chakira is an investigation as to the exact nature of something, and is usually stated as a binary choice: is X an A or is X a B? (X can be an object, a state, an action, etc.) A practical difference is generally sought so that the distinction is clear and known to be real, and, where possible, proof is brought as to whether X is in fact an A or a B.

It's popular in the writings of the rabbis Soloveitchik and their students.

It's useful because it clarifies the nature of X.