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Rambam discusses the phenomenon of the Torah mentioning seemingly irrelevant genealogies in Moreh Nevukhim (3:50) (see here). He includes the listing of the descendants of Noah, the descendants of Seir, the kings of Edom, and the like. He writes that the genealogies are meant to strengthen belief in the Torah's account of creation, starting with one man. This account may be difficult for some to accept given the multiplicity of languages and groups of humans. Particularly, some might doubt that such diversity developed over just a few millennia. The Torah therefore mentions the names of well known characters and their lineage, (and the story of how they got scattered throughout the world, and how their various languages developed), so that the Torah's account of creation; a fundament of Judaism, become more believable.

Radak writes similarly in his commentary to Genesis (5:29, and 9:28) regarding the mention of the decedents of Adam and Noah respectively.

For a discussion of the role of geologies by Prof. Aaron Demsky, a modern scholar, see here.

Rambam discusses the phenomenon of the Torah mentioning seemingly irrelevant genealogies in Moreh Nevukhim (3:50) (see here). He includes the listing of the descendants of Noah, the descendants of Seir, the kings of Edom, and the like. He writes that the genealogies are meant to strengthen belief in the Torah's account of creation, starting with one man. This account may be difficult for some to accept given the multiplicity of languages and groups of humans. Particularly, some might doubt that such diversity developed over just a few millennia. The Torah therefore mentions the names of well known characters and their lineage, (and the story of how they got scattered throughout the world, and how their various languages developed), so that the Torah's account of creation; a fundament of Judaism, become more believable.

Radak writes similarly in his commentary to Genesis (5:29, and 9:28) regarding the mention of the decedents of Adam and Noah respectively.

Rambam discusses the phenomenon of the Torah mentioning seemingly irrelevant genealogies in Moreh Nevukhim (3:50) (see here). He includes the listing of the descendants of Noah, the descendants of Seir, the kings of Edom, and the like. He writes that the genealogies are meant to strengthen belief in the Torah's account of creation, starting with one man. This account may be difficult for some to accept given the multiplicity of languages and groups of humans. Particularly, some might doubt that such diversity developed over just a few millennia. The Torah therefore mentions the names of well known characters and their lineage, (and the story of how they got scattered throughout the world, and how their various languages developed), so that the Torah's account of creation; a fundament of Judaism, become more believable.

Radak writes similarly in his commentary to Genesis (5:29, and 9:28) regarding the mention of the decedents of Adam and Noah respectively.

For a discussion of the role of geologies by Prof. Aaron Demsky, a modern scholar, see here.

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Rambam discusses the phenomenon of the Torah mentioning seemingly irrelevant genealogies in Moreh Nevukhim (3:50) (see here). He includes the listing of the descendants of Noah, the descendants of Seir, the kings of Edom, and the like. He writes that the genealogies are meant to strengthen belief in the Torah's account of creation, starting with one man. This account may be difficult for some to accept given the multiplicity of languages and groups of humans. Particularly, some might doubt that such diversity developed over just a few millennia. The Torah therefore mentions the names of well known characters and their lineage, (and the story of how they got scattered throughout the world, and how their various languages developed), so that the Torah's account of creation; a fundament of Judaism, become more believable.

Radak writes similarly in his commentary to Genesis (5:29, and 9:28) regarding the mention of the decedents of Adam and Noah respectively.