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The other answer here has the basics on the Melchizedek in Genesis and the Kohanim as the only legitimate Jewish priests.

Chapter 7 of Hebrews is an attempt by "Paul"(authorship of this particular letter by him has been disputed by some of the earliest church commentators, Eusebius, for example) to try and prove that Yeshu was a the new, permanent High Priest, even though he was from the Tribe of Judah. I'm not going to go over it line by line, the whole chapter is here, but the basic idea is that "Paul" writes that Melchizedek "resembles the Son of God", then tries to show that by Abraham's tithing to Melchizedek, and the quote of Psalm 110:4:

"The Lord swore and will not repent, you are a priest forever after the manner(JPS)/order(most non-Jewish translations) of Melchizedek"

that(as is usual in their supercessionist theology)the "Old Covenant", and the Levitical Priesthood, have been replaced by the "New Covenant", and that Yeshu is the new, permanent high priest, who offered himself as sacrifice for everyone's sins, etc.

At Qumran in cave 11 they found a badly worn text 11QMelchizedek, in which he seems to have a priestly/Messianic role(hard to tell for certain from the condition of the manuscript), so there were extra-Biblical legends floating around about him in Late Second Temple times. Some Qumran texts also mention his direct opposite, Melchiresha. Melchizedek also appears a few centuries later on as the subject of one of the Gnostic Nag Hammadi tracts.

The other answer here has the basics on the Melchizedek in Genesis and the Kohanim as the only legitimate Jewish priests.

Chapter 7 of Hebrews is an attempt by "Paul"(authorship of this particular letter by him has been disputed by some of the earliest church commentators, Eusebius, for example) to try and prove that Yeshu was a the new, permanent High Priest, even though he was from the Tribe of Judah. I'm not going to go over it line by line, the whole chapter is here, but the basic idea is that "Paul" writes that Melchizedek "resembles the Son of God", then tries to show that by Abraham's tithing to Melchizedek, and the quote of Psalm 110:4:

"The Lord swore and will not repent, you are a priest forever after the manner(JPS)/order(most non-Jewish translations) of Melchizedek"

that(as is usual in their supercessionist theology)the "Old Covenant", and the Levitical Priesthood, have been replaced by the "New Covenant", and that Yeshu is the new, permanent high priest, who offered himself as sacrifice for everyone's sins, etc.

At Qumran in cave 11 they found a badly worn text 11QMelchizedek, in which he seems to have a priestly/Messianic role(hard to tell for certain from the condition of the manuscript), so there were extra-Biblical legends floating around about him in Late Second Temple times. Some Qumran texts also mention his direct opposite, Melchiresha. Melchizedek also appears a few centuries later on as the subject of one of the Gnostic Nag Hammadi tracts.

The other answer here has the basics on the Melchizedek in Genesis and the Kohanim as the only legitimate Jewish priests.

Chapter 7 of Hebrews is an attempt by "Paul"(authorship of this particular letter by him has been disputed by some of the earliest church commentators, Eusebius, for example) to try and prove that Yeshu was the new, permanent High Priest, even though he was from the Tribe of Judah. I'm not going to go over it line by line, the whole chapter is here, but the basic idea is that "Paul" writes that Melchizedek "resembles the Son of God", then tries to show that by Abraham's tithing to Melchizedek, and the quote of Psalm 110:4:

"The Lord swore and will not repent, you are a priest forever after the manner(JPS)/order(most non-Jewish translations) of Melchizedek"

that(as is usual in their supercessionist theology)the "Old Covenant", and the Levitical Priesthood, have been replaced by the "New Covenant", and that Yeshu is the new, permanent high priest, who offered himself as sacrifice for everyone's sins, etc.

At Qumran in cave 11 they found a badly worn text 11QMelchizedek, in which he seems to have a priestly/Messianic role(hard to tell for certain from the condition of the manuscript), so there were extra-Biblical legends floating around about him in Late Second Temple times. Some Qumran texts also mention his direct opposite, Melchiresha. Melchizedek also appears a few centuries later on as the subject of one of the Gnostic Nag Hammadi tracts.

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The other answer here has the basics on the Melchizedek in Genesis and the Kohanim as the only legitimate Jewish priests.

Chapter 7 of Hebrews is an attempt by "Paul"(authorship of this particular letter by him has been disputed by some of the earliest church commentators, Eusebius, for example) to try and prove that Yeshu was a the new, permanent High Priest, even though he was from the Tribe of Judah. I'm not going to go over it line by line, the whole chapter is here, but the basic idea is that "Paul" writes that Melchizedek "resembles the Son of God", then tries to show that by Abraham's tithing to Melchizedek, and the quote of Psalm 110:4:

"The Lord swore and will not repent, you are a priest forever after the manner(JPS)/order(most non-Jewish translations) of Melchizedek"

that(as is usual in their supercessionist theology)the "Old Covenant", and the Levitical Priesthood, have been replaced by the "New Covenant", and that Yeshu is the new, permanent high priest, who offered himself as sacrifice for everyone's sins, etc.

At Qumran in cave 11 they found a badly worn text 11QMelchizedek, in which he seems to have a priestly/Messianic role(hard to tell for certain from the condition of the manuscript), so there were extra-Biblical legends floating around about him in Late Second Temple times. HeSome Qumran texts also mention his direct opposite, Melchiresha. Melchizedek also appears a few centuries later on as the subject of one of the Gnostic Nag Hammadi tracts.

The other answer here has the basics on the Melchizedek in Genesis and the Kohanim as the only legitimate Jewish priests.

Chapter 7 of Hebrews is an attempt by "Paul"(authorship of this particular letter by him has been disputed by some of the earliest church commentators, Eusebius, for example) to try and prove that Yeshu was a the new, permanent High Priest, even though he was from the Tribe of Judah. I'm not going to go over it line by line, the whole chapter is here, but the basic idea is that "Paul" writes that Melchizedek "resembles the Son of God", then tries to show that by Abraham's tithing to Melchizedek, and the quote of Psalm 110:4:

"The Lord swore and will not repent, you are a priest forever after the manner(JPS)/order(most non-Jewish translations) of Melchizedek"

that(as is usual in their supercessionist theology)the "Old Covenant", and the Levitical Priesthood, have been replaced by the "New Covenant", and that Yeshu is the new, permanent high priest, who offered himself as sacrifice for everyone's sins, etc.

At Qumran in cave 11 they found a badly worn text 11QMelchizedek, in which he seems to have a priestly/Messianic role(hard to tell for certain from the condition of the manuscript), so there were extra-Biblical legends floating around about him in Late Second Temple times. He also appears a few centuries later on as the subject of one of the Gnostic Nag Hammadi tracts.

The other answer here has the basics on the Melchizedek in Genesis and the Kohanim as the only legitimate Jewish priests.

Chapter 7 of Hebrews is an attempt by "Paul"(authorship of this particular letter by him has been disputed by some of the earliest church commentators, Eusebius, for example) to try and prove that Yeshu was a the new, permanent High Priest, even though he was from the Tribe of Judah. I'm not going to go over it line by line, the whole chapter is here, but the basic idea is that "Paul" writes that Melchizedek "resembles the Son of God", then tries to show that by Abraham's tithing to Melchizedek, and the quote of Psalm 110:4:

"The Lord swore and will not repent, you are a priest forever after the manner(JPS)/order(most non-Jewish translations) of Melchizedek"

that(as is usual in their supercessionist theology)the "Old Covenant", and the Levitical Priesthood, have been replaced by the "New Covenant", and that Yeshu is the new, permanent high priest, who offered himself as sacrifice for everyone's sins, etc.

At Qumran in cave 11 they found a badly worn text 11QMelchizedek, in which he seems to have a priestly/Messianic role(hard to tell for certain from the condition of the manuscript), so there were extra-Biblical legends floating around about him in Late Second Temple times. Some Qumran texts also mention his direct opposite, Melchiresha. Melchizedek also appears a few centuries later on as the subject of one of the Gnostic Nag Hammadi tracts.

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The other answer here has the basics on the Melchizedek in Genesis and the Kohanim as the only legitimate Jewish priests.

Chapter 7 of Hebrews is an attempt by "Paul"(authorship of this particular letter by him has been disputed by some of the earliest church commentators, Eusebius, for example) to try and prove that Yeshu was a the new, permanent High Priest, even though he was from the Tribe of Judah. I'm not going to go over it line by line, the whole chapter is here, but the basic idea is that "Paul" writes that Melchizedek "resembles the Son of God", then tries to show that by Abraham's tithing to Melchizedek, and the quote of Psalm 110:4:

"The Lord swore and will not repent, you are a priest forever after the manner(JPS)/order(most non-Jewish translations) of Melchizedek"

that(as is usual in their supercessionist theology)the "Old Covenant", and the Levitical Priesthood, have been replaced by the "New Covenant", and that Yeshu is the new, permanent high priest, who offered himself as sacrifice for everyone's sins, etc.

At Qumran in cave 11 they found a badly worn text 11QMelchizedek, in which he seems to have a priestly/Messianic role(hard to tell for certain from the condition of the manuscript), so there were extra-Biblical legends floating around about him in Late Second Temple times. He also appears a few centuries later on as the subject of one of the Gnostic Nag Hammadi tracts. 

The other answer here has the basics on the Melchizedek in Genesis.

Chapter 7 of Hebrews is an attempt by "Paul"(authorship of this particular letter by him has been disputed by some of the earliest church commentators, Eusebius, for example) to try and prove that Yeshu was a the new, permanent High Priest, even though he was from the Tribe of Judah. I'm not going to go over it line by line, the whole chapter is here, but the basic idea is that "Paul" writes that Melchizedek "resembles the Son of God", then tries to show that by Abraham's tithing to Melchizedek, and the quote of Psalm 110:4:

"The Lord swore and will not repent, you are a priest forever after the manner(JPS)/order(most non-Jewish translations) of Melchizedek"

that(as is usual in their supercessionist theology)the "Old Covenant", and the Levitical Priesthood, have been replaced by the "New Covenant", and that Yeshu is the new, permanent high priest, who offered himself as sacrifice for everyone's sins, etc.

At Qumran in cave 11 they found a badly worn text 11QMelchizedek, in which he seems to have a priestly/Messianic role(hard to tell for certain from the condition of the manuscript), so there were extra-Biblical legends floating around about him in Late Second Temple times.

The other answer here has the basics on the Melchizedek in Genesis and the Kohanim as the only legitimate Jewish priests.

Chapter 7 of Hebrews is an attempt by "Paul"(authorship of this particular letter by him has been disputed by some of the earliest church commentators, Eusebius, for example) to try and prove that Yeshu was a the new, permanent High Priest, even though he was from the Tribe of Judah. I'm not going to go over it line by line, the whole chapter is here, but the basic idea is that "Paul" writes that Melchizedek "resembles the Son of God", then tries to show that by Abraham's tithing to Melchizedek, and the quote of Psalm 110:4:

"The Lord swore and will not repent, you are a priest forever after the manner(JPS)/order(most non-Jewish translations) of Melchizedek"

that(as is usual in their supercessionist theology)the "Old Covenant", and the Levitical Priesthood, have been replaced by the "New Covenant", and that Yeshu is the new, permanent high priest, who offered himself as sacrifice for everyone's sins, etc.

At Qumran in cave 11 they found a badly worn text 11QMelchizedek, in which he seems to have a priestly/Messianic role(hard to tell for certain from the condition of the manuscript), so there were extra-Biblical legends floating around about him in Late Second Temple times. He also appears a few centuries later on as the subject of one of the Gnostic Nag Hammadi tracts. 

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