5 added 92 characters in body
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Say that you are unable to pray with a minyan, and it is a day on which musaf is said. You plan on praying everything up to and including shaḥarit in one go, and then pray musaf later (since musaf need not be said at the same time as shaḥarit). What do you do about everything that comes after shaḥarit besides the musaf prayer itself?

I see two main possibilities:

  1. You should not deviate from the usual order of the prayer service. You should stop at some point (where?) after shaḥarit, and continue from that point (without repeating anything) when about to pray musaf. Motivation for this choice: this is how the service "normally goes".
  2. You should finish the prayer service as you would normally do, omitting musaf, and pray musaf (and only musaf) later. Motivation for this choice: most of the post-shaḥarit elements are also said on a day without musaf, so why should we omit them now?

Or perhaps some middle ground, where you still finish the service (whatever that means), but omit more than just musaf (say, ein keloheinu on shabbat, or hosha'not on sukkot), or perhaps where you repeat certain sections when praying musaf (eg. say ashrei again).

Does the answer change depending on how long the gap is between shaḥarit and musaf? Does the answer change depending on what the day is (shabbat, yom tov, rosh ḥodesh, ḥol hammo'ed)?

Say that you are unable to pray with a minyan, and it is a day on which musaf is said. You plan on praying everything up to and including shaḥarit in one go, and then pray musaf later (since musaf need not be said at the same time as shaḥarit). What do you do about everything that comes after shaḥarit besides the musaf prayer itself?

I see two main possibilities:

  1. You should not deviate from the usual order of the prayer service. You should stop at some point (where?) after shaḥarit, and continue from that point (without repeating anything) when about to pray musaf. Motivation for this choice: this is how the service "normally goes".
  2. You should finish the prayer service as you would normally do, omitting musaf, and pray musaf (and only musaf) later. Motivation for this choice: most of the post-shaḥarit elements are also said on a day without musaf, so why should we omit them now?

Or perhaps some middle ground, where you still finish the service (whatever that means), but omit more than just musaf (say, ein keloheinu on shabbat, or hosha'not on sukkot).

Does the answer change depending on how long the gap is between shaḥarit and musaf? Does the answer change depending on what the day is (shabbat, yom tov, rosh ḥodesh, ḥol hammo'ed)?

Say that you are unable to pray with a minyan, and it is a day on which musaf is said. You plan on praying everything up to and including shaḥarit in one go, and then pray musaf later (since musaf need not be said at the same time as shaḥarit). What do you do about everything that comes after shaḥarit besides the musaf prayer itself?

I see two main possibilities:

  1. You should not deviate from the usual order of the prayer service. You should stop at some point (where?) after shaḥarit, and continue from that point (without repeating anything) when about to pray musaf. Motivation for this choice: this is how the service "normally goes".
  2. You should finish the prayer service as you would normally do, omitting musaf, and pray musaf (and only musaf) later. Motivation for this choice: most of the post-shaḥarit elements are also said on a day without musaf, so why should we omit them now?

Or perhaps some middle ground, where you still finish the service (whatever that means), but omit more than just musaf (say, ein keloheinu on shabbat, or hosha'not on sukkot), or perhaps where you repeat certain sections when praying musaf (eg. say ashrei again).

Does the answer change depending on how long the gap is between shaḥarit and musaf? Does the answer change depending on what the day is (shabbat, yom tov, rosh ḥodesh, ḥol hammo'ed)?

4 rewrote question to omit congregational aspect, focusing on the individual
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How best to pray shaḥarit alone and musaf with a congregationseparately

Say that it'syou are unable to pray with a Shabbatminyan, and that you are only able to joinit is a congregation forday on which musaf (that is, you pray said. You plan on praying everything up to and including shaḥarit alone at homein one go, and you're not in any rush tothen pray).

In my experience, when praying the entire service with a congregation, certain parts of the service (ein keloheinu, aleinu, an'im z'mirotmusaf, and later (perhapssince musaf need not be said at the same time as shaḥarit). What do you do about everything that comes after shir shel yomshaḥarit) come after besides the musaf. Here, prayer itself?

I see two main optionspossibilities:

  1. You should not deviate from the usual order of the prayer service. You should stop at some point (where?) after shaḥarit, and continue from that point (omitting everything after thewithout repeating anything) when about to pray sh'mone 'esre of shaḥaritmusaf until joining the congregation). Motivation for this choice: this is how the service "normally goes"; it's preferable to say certain parts of our prayers as a congregationgoes".
  2. You should finish the prayer service as an individualyou would normally do, but omitting musaf, and joining the congregation forpray musaf (and only musaf) later. Motivation for this choice: musaf need not be said at the same time as shaḥarit, so perhaps most of the post-musafshaḥarit with the congregation is consideredelements are also said on a separate prayer service, and therefore there is no reason to omit anything from the normalday without shaḥaritmusaf service., so why should we omit them now?

Or maybeperhaps some middle ground: the individual says certain parts alone — perhaps due to, where you still finish the gap betweenservice (whatever that means), but omit more than just shaḥaritmusaf and the continuation with the congregation? — and says/repeats certain parts with the congregation(say, ein keloheinu on shabbat, or hosha'not on sukkot).

Does the answer dependchange depending on how long the gap is between shaḥarit and musaf? Does thisthe answer change if you can joindepending on what the congregation for/during Torah readingday is (shabbat, yom tov, rosh ḥodesh, ḥol hammo'ed)?

How to pray shaḥarit alone and musaf with a congregation

Say that it's Shabbat, and that you are only able to join a congregation for musaf (that is, you pray shaḥarit alone at home, and you're not in any rush to pray).

In my experience, when praying the entire service with a congregation, certain parts of the service (ein keloheinu, aleinu, an'im z'mirot, and (perhaps) shir shel yom) come after musaf. Here, I see two main options:

  1. You should not deviate from the usual order of the prayer service. You should stop after shaḥarit (omitting everything after the sh'mone 'esre of shaḥarit until joining the congregation). Motivation for this choice: this is how the service "normally goes"; it's preferable to say certain parts of our prayers as a congregation.
  2. You should finish the prayer service as an individual would normally do, but omitting musaf, and joining the congregation for musaf. Motivation for this choice: musaf need not be said at the same time as shaḥarit, so perhaps musaf with the congregation is considered a separate prayer service, and therefore there is no reason to omit anything from the normal shaḥarit service.

Or maybe some middle ground: the individual says certain parts alone — perhaps due to the gap between shaḥarit and the continuation with the congregation? — and says/repeats certain parts with the congregation.

Does the answer depend on the gap between shaḥarit and musaf? Does this change if you can join the congregation for/during Torah reading?

How best to pray shaḥarit and musaf separately

Say that you are unable to pray with a minyan, and it is a day on which musaf is said. You plan on praying everything up to and including shaḥarit in one go, and then pray musaf later (since musaf need not be said at the same time as shaḥarit). What do you do about everything that comes after shaḥarit besides the musaf prayer itself?

I see two main possibilities:

  1. You should not deviate from the usual order of the prayer service. You should stop at some point (where?) after shaḥarit, and continue from that point (without repeating anything) when about to pray musaf. Motivation for this choice: this is how the service "normally goes".
  2. You should finish the prayer service as you would normally do, omitting musaf, and pray musaf (and only musaf) later. Motivation for this choice: most of the post-shaḥarit elements are also said on a day without musaf, so why should we omit them now?

Or perhaps some middle ground, where you still finish the service (whatever that means), but omit more than just musaf (say, ein keloheinu on shabbat, or hosha'not on sukkot).

Does the answer change depending on how long the gap is between shaḥarit and musaf? Does the answer change depending on what the day is (shabbat, yom tov, rosh ḥodesh, ḥol hammo'ed)?

3 Clarification
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Say that it's Shabbat, and that you are only able to join a congregation for musaf (that is, you need to pray shaḥarit alone at home, and you're not in any rush to pray).

In my experience, when praying the entire service with a congregation, certain parts of the service (ein keloheinu, aleinu, an'im z'mirot, and (perhaps) shir shel yom) come after musaf. Here, I see two main options:

  1. You should not deviate from the usual order of the prayer service. You should stop after shaḥarit (omitting everything after the sh'mone 'esre of shaḥarit until joining the congregation). Motivation for this choice: this is how the service "normally goes"; it's preferable to say certain parts of our prayers as a congregation.
  2. You should finish the prayer service as an individual would normally do, but omitting musaf, and joining the congregation for musaf. Motivation for this choice: musaf need not be said at the same time as shaḥarit, so perhaps musaf with the congregation is considered a separate prayer service, and therefore there is no reason to omit anything from the normal shaḥarit service.

Or maybe some middle ground: the individual says certain parts alone — perhaps due to the gap between shaḥarit and the continuation with the congregation? — and says/repeats certain parts with the congregation.

Does the answer depend on the gap between shaḥarit and musaf? Does this change if you can join the congregation for/during Torah reading?

Say that it's Shabbat, and that you are only able to join a congregation for musaf (that is, you need to pray shaḥarit alone).

In my experience, when praying the entire service with a congregation, certain parts of the service (ein keloheinu, aleinu, an'im z'mirot, and (perhaps) shir shel yom) come after musaf. Here, I see two main options:

  1. You should not deviate from the usual order of the prayer service. You should stop after shaḥarit (omitting everything after the sh'mone 'esre of shaḥarit until joining the congregation). Motivation for this choice: this is how the service "normally goes"; it's preferable to say certain parts of our prayers as a congregation.
  2. You should finish the prayer service as an individual would normally do, but omitting musaf, and joining the congregation for musaf. Motivation for this choice: musaf need not be said at the same time as shaḥarit, so perhaps musaf with the congregation is considered a separate prayer service, and therefore there is no reason to omit anything from the normal shaḥarit service.

Or maybe some middle ground: the individual says certain parts alone — perhaps due to the gap between shaḥarit and the continuation with the congregation? — and says/repeats certain parts with the congregation.

Does the answer depend on the gap between shaḥarit and musaf? Does this change if you can join the congregation for/during Torah reading?

Say that it's Shabbat, and that you are only able to join a congregation for musaf (that is, you pray shaḥarit alone at home, and you're not in any rush to pray).

In my experience, when praying the entire service with a congregation, certain parts of the service (ein keloheinu, aleinu, an'im z'mirot, and (perhaps) shir shel yom) come after musaf. Here, I see two main options:

  1. You should not deviate from the usual order of the prayer service. You should stop after shaḥarit (omitting everything after the sh'mone 'esre of shaḥarit until joining the congregation). Motivation for this choice: this is how the service "normally goes"; it's preferable to say certain parts of our prayers as a congregation.
  2. You should finish the prayer service as an individual would normally do, but omitting musaf, and joining the congregation for musaf. Motivation for this choice: musaf need not be said at the same time as shaḥarit, so perhaps musaf with the congregation is considered a separate prayer service, and therefore there is no reason to omit anything from the normal shaḥarit service.

Or maybe some middle ground: the individual says certain parts alone — perhaps due to the gap between shaḥarit and the continuation with the congregation? — and says/repeats certain parts with the congregation.

Does the answer depend on the gap between shaḥarit and musaf? Does this change if you can join the congregation for/during Torah reading?

2 corrected title to match contents
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