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Wacky Mac, like the lulav, has four distinct components that must all be present in order to fulfill the mitzvah. According to the kabbalists, these four shapes can be compared to four types of Jews:

  • The wheel has no beginning or end, and it can move through the world; it represents a person with wisdom (there is no end to learning) and good deeds (action in the world).

  • The tube is straight and narrow; it represents a person with good deeds (following the straight path, the halacha) but without wisdom (he is focused and does not explore beyond the bounds of the tube).

  • The shell can hold much but goes nowhere; it represents a person with wisdom (that he has retained) but without good deeds (he's not doing anything with it).

  • The spiral is crazy and undirected and retains nothing, aside from whatever bits of cheesy goo cling desperately to it but the spiral gets no credit for that. It represents a person with neither wisdom nor good deeds.

The mitzvah of Wacky Mac reminds us that Yisrael is made up of all of these types; we cannot concern ourselves only with the wheels or dismiss the spirals out of hand. We need to bring them all together. And thus, to fulfill the mitzvah, you must have in your spoon an equal positive number of each. One of each is sufficient, but those with big mouths are encouraged to increase the number.

Once you have lifted up this first spoonful, said the 'al netilat rotev g'vinahb'racha, and eaten, you may eat the rest in any combination so long as you eat at least a shiur within four minutes, like with matzah.

What is the b'racha? Some say 'al netilat rotev g'vinah, because as with the lulav we are focusing on the combination of distinct elements coming together, but others say 'al achilat rotev g'vinah because, as with Pesach, we are after all eating the special food. Some try to satisfy both opinions by having Wacky Mac with more than one Purim meal, or by having it twice within the same meal but as separate courses (rinsing their mouths out between), but I'm not aware of an authoritative p'sak.

Wacky Mac, like the lulav, has four distinct components that must all be present in order to fulfill the mitzvah. According to the kabbalists, these four shapes can be compared to four types of Jews:

  • The wheel has no beginning or end, and it can move through the world; it represents a person with wisdom (there is no end to learning) and good deeds (action in the world).

  • The tube is straight and narrow; it represents a person with good deeds (following the straight path, the halacha) but without wisdom (he is focused and does not explore beyond the bounds of the tube).

  • The shell can hold much but goes nowhere; it represents a person with wisdom (that he has retained) but without good deeds (he's not doing anything with it).

  • The spiral is crazy and undirected and retains nothing, aside from whatever bits of cheesy goo cling desperately to it but the spiral gets no credit for that. It represents a person with neither wisdom nor good deeds.

The mitzvah of Wacky Mac reminds us that Yisrael is made up of all of these types; we cannot concern ourselves only with the wheels or dismiss the spirals out of hand. We need to bring them all together. And thus, to fulfill the mitzvah, you must have in your spoon an equal positive number of each. One of each is sufficient, but those with big mouths are encouraged to increase the number.

Once you have lifted up this first spoonful, said 'al netilat rotev g'vinah, and eaten, you may eat the rest in any combination so long as you eat at least a shiur within four minutes, like with matzah.

Wacky Mac, like the lulav, has four distinct components that must all be present in order to fulfill the mitzvah. According to the kabbalists, these four shapes can be compared to four types of Jews:

  • The wheel has no beginning or end, and it can move through the world; it represents a person with wisdom (there is no end to learning) and good deeds (action in the world).

  • The tube is straight and narrow; it represents a person with good deeds (following the straight path, the halacha) but without wisdom (he is focused and does not explore beyond the bounds of the tube).

  • The shell can hold much but goes nowhere; it represents a person with wisdom (that he has retained) but without good deeds (he's not doing anything with it).

  • The spiral is crazy and undirected and retains nothing, aside from whatever bits of cheesy goo cling desperately to it but the spiral gets no credit for that. It represents a person with neither wisdom nor good deeds.

The mitzvah of Wacky Mac reminds us that Yisrael is made up of all of these types; we cannot concern ourselves only with the wheels or dismiss the spirals out of hand. We need to bring them all together. And thus, to fulfill the mitzvah, you must have in your spoon an equal positive number of each. One of each is sufficient, but those with big mouths are encouraged to increase the number.

Once you have lifted up this first spoonful, said the b'racha, and eaten, you may eat the rest in any combination so long as you eat at least a shiur within four minutes, like with matzah.

What is the b'racha? Some say 'al netilat rotev g'vinah, because as with the lulav we are focusing on the combination of distinct elements coming together, but others say 'al achilat rotev g'vinah because, as with Pesach, we are after all eating the special food. Some try to satisfy both opinions by having Wacky Mac with more than one Purim meal, or by having it twice within the same meal but as separate courses (rinsing their mouths out between), but I'm not aware of an authoritative p'sak.

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Wacky Mac, like the lulav, has four distinct components that must all be present in order to fulfill the mitzvah. According to the kabbalists, these four shapes can be compared to four types of Jews:

  • The wheel has no beginning or end, and it can move through the world; it represents a person with wisdom (there is no end to learning) and good deeds (action in the world).

  • The tube is straight and narrow; it represents a person with good deeds (following the straight path, the halacha) but without wisdom (he is focused and does not explore beyond the bounds of the tube).

  • The shell can hold much but goes nowhere; it represents a person with wisdom (that he has retained) but without good deeds (he's not doing anything with it).

  • The spiral is crazy and undirected and retains nothing, aside from whatever bits of cheesy goo cling desperately to it but the spiral gets no credit for that. It represents a person with neither wisdom nor good deeds.

The mitzvah of Wacky Mac reminds us that Yisrael is made up of all of these types; we cannot concern ourselves only with the wheels or dismiss the spirals out of hand. We need to bring them all together. And thus, to fulfill the mitzvah, you must have in your spoon an equal positive number of each. One of each is sufficient, but those with big mouths are encouraged to increase the number.

Once you have lifted up this first spoonful, said 'al netilat rotev g'vinah, and eaten, you may eat the rest in any combination so long as you eat at least a shiur within four minutes, like with matzah.