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The term "Histakel Be'Oraisa Uvara Alma" is often invoked when discussing chassidus or metaphysics. Literally translated, it means "[Hashem] gazed in[to] the Torah and created the world."

While the exact interpretation of this phrase has been debatedthe exact interpretation of this phrase has been debated, I'm currently interested in his etymology - when and where does this phrase first appear in Jewish literature? Is it unique to Judaism, a cognate from another culture or are there cognates that sprang from it?

The term "Histakel Be'Oraisa Uvara Alma" is often invoked when discussing chassidus or metaphysics. Literally translated, it means "[Hashem] gazed in[to] the Torah and created the world."

While the exact interpretation of this phrase has been debated, I'm currently interested in his etymology - when and where does this phrase first appear in Jewish literature? Is it unique to Judaism, a cognate from another culture or are there cognates that sprang from it?

The term "Histakel Be'Oraisa Uvara Alma" is often invoked when discussing chassidus or metaphysics. Literally translated, it means "[Hashem] gazed in[to] the Torah and created the world."

While the exact interpretation of this phrase has been debated, I'm currently interested in his etymology - when and where does this phrase first appear in Jewish literature? Is it unique to Judaism, a cognate from another culture or are there cognates that sprang from it?

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Origin of Histakel Be'Oraisa Uvara Alma

The term "Histakel Be'Oraisa Uvara Alma" is often invoked when discussing chassidus or metaphysics. Literally translated, it means "[Hashem] gazed in[to] the Torah and created the world."

While the exact interpretation of this phrase has been debated, I'm currently interested in his etymology - when and where does this phrase first appear in Jewish literature? Is it unique to Judaism, a cognate from another culture or are there cognates that sprang from it?