3 provided more sources
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  1. Becoming king causes one's sins to be forgiven (Yerushalmi Bikurim 11b)

  2. The Gemara (Sanhedrin 14a) states that assuming a positioncertain positions of authority (the Gemara there is discussing semicha, but says it's also true about anyone who is "oleh lgedulah") causes one's sins to be forgiven (See Maharsha, however, for an alternate understanding of the Gemara).

  3. Converting to Judaism causes one's prior sins to be forgiven (Yerushalmi Bikurim 11b).

  1. Becoming king causes one's sins to be forgiven (Yerushalmi Bikurim 11b)

  2. The Gemara (Sanhedrin 14a) states that assuming a position of authority (the Gemara there is discussing semicha, but says it's also true about anyone who is "oleh lgedulah") causes one's sins to be forgiven (See Maharsha, however, for an alternate understanding of the Gemara).

  3. Converting to Judaism causes one's prior sins to be forgiven (Yerushalmi Bikurim 11b).

  1. Becoming king causes one's sins to be forgiven (Yerushalmi Bikurim 11b)

  2. The Gemara (Sanhedrin 14a) states that assuming certain positions of authority (the Gemara there is discussing semicha, but says it's also true about anyone who is "oleh lgedulah") causes one's sins to be forgiven (See Maharsha, however, for an alternate understanding of the Gemara).

  3. Converting to Judaism causes one's prior sins to be forgiven (Yerushalmi Bikurim 11b).

2 provided more sources
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  1. I don't recall the source, but I believe becoming a KingBecoming king causes one's sins to be forgiven. (It may be related to 2.Yerushalmi Bikurim 11b) 

  2. The Gemara (Sanhedrin 14a) states that assuming a position of authority (the Gemara there is discussing semicha, but says it's also true about anyone who is "oleh lgedulah") causes one's sins to be forgiven (See Maharsha, however, for an alternate understanding of the Gemara).

  3. Again not sure of source, but I believe a convert has his/herConverting to Judaism causes one's prior sins to be forgiven (Yerushalmi Bikurim 11b).

  1. I don't recall the source, but I believe becoming a King causes one's sins to be forgiven. (It may be related to 2.)

  2. The Gemara (Sanhedrin 14a) states that assuming a position of authority (the Gemara there is discussing semicha) causes one's sins to be forgiven (See Maharsha, however, for an alternate understanding of the Gemara).

  3. Again not sure of source, but I believe a convert has his/her prior sins forgiven.

  1. Becoming king causes one's sins to be forgiven (Yerushalmi Bikurim 11b) 

  2. The Gemara (Sanhedrin 14a) states that assuming a position of authority (the Gemara there is discussing semicha, but says it's also true about anyone who is "oleh lgedulah") causes one's sins to be forgiven (See Maharsha, however, for an alternate understanding of the Gemara).

  3. Converting to Judaism causes one's prior sins to be forgiven (Yerushalmi Bikurim 11b).

1
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  1. I don't recall the source, but I believe becoming a King causes one's sins to be forgiven. (It may be related to 2.)

  2. The Gemara (Sanhedrin 14a) states that assuming a position of authority (the Gemara there is discussing semicha) causes one's sins to be forgiven (See Maharsha, however, for an alternate understanding of the Gemara).

  3. Again not sure of source, but I believe a convert has his/her prior sins forgiven.