4 added 112 characters in body
source | link

Here are some of the reasons cremation is forbidden with the footnotes pointing to the Halachos involved. These help explain why someone should not sit shivah as explained in footnote 4

Here are some of the reasons with the footnotes pointing to the Halachos involved.

Here are some of the reasons cremation is forbidden with the footnotes pointing to the Halachos involved. These help explain why someone should not sit shivah as explained in footnote 4

3 added 436 characters in body
source | link

The source for this difference is that a person has deliberately transgressed the Will of his creator. We are commanded to treat the body with respect and to bury it in the Earth because it was created from the Earth in order to house the soul. Note that this is only when this horrible act is done of the person's own free will (at the request of the person before he died). If it was done through malice (by others) or ignorance, then the ashes can be reburied in a Jewish cemetery as an act of respect towards the mais.

In the past, cremation was regarded as a deliberate attempt to deny resurrection of the dead and the coming of the mashiach, if not denial of the very existence of Hashem.

There are references that a "tinok shenishba" (ignorant through lack of education) can have the ashes reburied. However, the Ohr Sameach "Ask the Rabbi" seems to say that even nowadays, one should not sit shiva for anyone who requests cremation. Note that the answer below does not differentiate between cases.

As a result, we see from a number of sources.

Cremation, Consequences

according to Jewish law, one should not "sit shiva" (observe Jewish mourning rites) for someone who was cremated voluntarily, nor is one obliged to bury their ashes. You will not be able to properly mourn for her, and no kaddish will be said for her. This may have an impact. In addition, the body of a voluntarily cremated person is not liable for resurrection; this is not so much because of the physical impediment, but rather in line with the concept that one who doesn't believe in resurrection will not experience it.

Cremation declares that this world is the beginning and end of Man. A basis of Jewish faith is that this is not true. The body is held on deposit, and together with the soul, it really belongs to G-d. G-d decides when and where a person should die, and what should be done with the body once it has fulfilled its "this-worldly" purpose.

Here are some of the reasons with the footnotes pointing to the Halachos involved.

He then summarizes the entire discussion as and gives a number of reasons why cremation is wrong. The list is too long to put here, but can be found at the linked page.

Cremation

· is a transgression of a Biblical law to bury our dead,
· demonstrates a rejection of G‑d's supreme "ownership" over all of Creation,
· violates our legal responsibility to return what was loaned to us (our bodies) in as wholesome a state as possible,
· constitutes a rejection of the Jewish belief of tzelem Elokim (created in G‑d's image),
· constitutes a rejection of the Jewish belief in resurrection of the dead,
· (if done voluntarily, knowing fully the responsibilities) will cause the body not to be included among the Jewish People when the time of resurrection arrives,
· violates the biblical prohibition of following heathen practices,
· upends the soul's natural separation and acclimation process, thus causing it additional untold pain,
· deviates from Jewish history and our forebears' and contemporaries' selfless and heroic efforts to properly bury our dead, and
· declares, in effect, that once the soul has departed the body, the lifeless body has no further value.

The source for this difference is that a person has deliberately transgressed the Will of his creator. We are commanded to treat the body with respect and to bury it in the Earth because it was created from the Earth in order to house the soul. Note that this is only when this horrible act is done of the person's own free will (at the request of the person before he died). If it was done through malice (by others) or ignorance, then the ashes can be reburied in a Jewish cemetery as an act of respect towards the mais.

In the past, cremation was regarded as a deliberate attempt to deny resurrection of the dead and the coming of the mashiach, if not denial of the very existence of Hashem.

He then summarizes the entire discussion as

Cremation

· is a transgression of a Biblical law to bury our dead,
· demonstrates a rejection of G‑d's supreme "ownership" over all of Creation,
· violates our legal responsibility to return what was loaned to us (our bodies) in as wholesome a state as possible,
· constitutes a rejection of the Jewish belief of tzelem Elokim (created in G‑d's image),
· constitutes a rejection of the Jewish belief in resurrection of the dead,
· (if done voluntarily, knowing fully the responsibilities) will cause the body not to be included among the Jewish People when the time of resurrection arrives,
· violates the biblical prohibition of following heathen practices,
· upends the soul's natural separation and acclimation process, thus causing it additional untold pain,
· deviates from Jewish history and our forebears' and contemporaries' selfless and heroic efforts to properly bury our dead, and
· declares, in effect, that once the soul has departed the body, the lifeless body has no further value.

The source for this difference is that a person has deliberately transgressed the Will of his creator. We are commanded to treat the body with respect and to bury it in the Earth because it was created from the Earth in order to house the soul. Note that this is only when this horrible act is done of the person's own free will (at the request of the person before he died). If it was done through malice (by others) then the ashes can be reburied in a Jewish cemetery as an act of respect towards the mais.

In the past, cremation was regarded as a deliberate attempt to deny resurrection of the dead and the coming of the mashiach, if not denial of the very existence of Hashem.

There are references that a "tinok shenishba" (ignorant through lack of education) can have the ashes reburied. However, the Ohr Sameach "Ask the Rabbi" seems to say that even nowadays, one should not sit shiva for anyone who requests cremation. Note that the answer below does not differentiate between cases.

As a result, we see from a number of sources.

Cremation, Consequences

according to Jewish law, one should not "sit shiva" (observe Jewish mourning rites) for someone who was cremated voluntarily, nor is one obliged to bury their ashes. You will not be able to properly mourn for her, and no kaddish will be said for her. This may have an impact. In addition, the body of a voluntarily cremated person is not liable for resurrection; this is not so much because of the physical impediment, but rather in line with the concept that one who doesn't believe in resurrection will not experience it.

Cremation declares that this world is the beginning and end of Man. A basis of Jewish faith is that this is not true. The body is held on deposit, and together with the soul, it really belongs to G-d. G-d decides when and where a person should die, and what should be done with the body once it has fulfilled its "this-worldly" purpose.

Here are some of the reasons with the footnotes pointing to the Halachos involved.

He then summarizes the entire discussion and gives a number of reasons why cremation is wrong. The list is too long to put here, but can be found at the linked page.

2 deleted 1066 characters in body
source | link

What is the Jewish View on Cremation?

Cremation has always been looked upon with horror by every sector of Jewish thought. The body is sacred, because it is the "temple of the soul" and because it is the medium by which we do goodness in this world.

Belief in the resurrection of the dead is counted by Maimonides as the thirteenth of the Thirteen Principles of the Faith. There is no rabbinic authority who does not consider this to be a fundamental belief. The Mishnah declares denial of this principle to be heresy. The reason is quite apparent: As Jews, we believe there is purpose to life, purpose to this world, purpose to the act of Creation. Therefore, anything that is used towards that purpose has a permanence -- and a sanctity.

Six million of our people were denied proper burial, most of them cremated. Should we willfully continue that which our enemies began?

Further details can be found at Why Does Jewish Law Forbid Cremation?

What is the Jewish View on Cremation?

Cremation has always been looked upon with horror by every sector of Jewish thought. The body is sacred, because it is the "temple of the soul" and because it is the medium by which we do goodness in this world.

Belief in the resurrection of the dead is counted by Maimonides as the thirteenth of the Thirteen Principles of the Faith. There is no rabbinic authority who does not consider this to be a fundamental belief. The Mishnah declares denial of this principle to be heresy. The reason is quite apparent: As Jews, we believe there is purpose to life, purpose to this world, purpose to the act of Creation. Therefore, anything that is used towards that purpose has a permanence -- and a sanctity.

Six million of our people were denied proper burial, most of them cremated. Should we willfully continue that which our enemies began?

Further details can be found at Why Does Jewish Law Forbid Cremation?

Why Does Jewish Law Forbid Cremation?

1
source | link