2 struck out point based on incorrect assumption
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Two possibilities I can think of:

  • The E-ink is not permanent stuff (it disappears as soon as the power is cut, for example). So it might be akin to writing Hashem's name in fruit juice or something similar. In the laws of Shabbos, that is not considered true "writing" (though it's still forbidden Rabbinically - see Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chaim 340:4 and Mishnah Berurah there :18 and :22), so possibly - though I haven't found any source to substantiate this - it may not be considered "writing" for this purpose either.The E-ink is not permanent stuff (it disappears as soon as the power is cut, for example). So it might be akin to writing Hashem's name in fruit juice or something similar. In the laws of Shabbos, that is not considered true "writing" (though it's still forbidden Rabbinically - see Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chaim 340:4 and Mishnah Berurah there :18 and :22), so possibly - though I haven't found any source to substantiate this - it may not be considered "writing" for this purpose either.

  • On these devices, as far as I know, you "erase" the words somewhat indirectly (by flipping to the next page, or turning them off, or whatever - but not by doing anything directly to the E-ink particles themselves). Indirect erasure of Hashem's name is not prohibited (Shabbos 120b, cited in Minchas Chinuch 437:14; there is an extensive discussion of the details of this law in the commentaries to Rambam, Hil. Yesodei Hatorah 6:6).

Two possibilities I can think of:

  • The E-ink is not permanent stuff (it disappears as soon as the power is cut, for example). So it might be akin to writing Hashem's name in fruit juice or something similar. In the laws of Shabbos, that is not considered true "writing" (though it's still forbidden Rabbinically - see Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chaim 340:4 and Mishnah Berurah there :18 and :22), so possibly - though I haven't found any source to substantiate this - it may not be considered "writing" for this purpose either.

  • On these devices, as far as I know, you "erase" the words somewhat indirectly (by flipping to the next page, or turning them off, or whatever - but not by doing anything directly to the E-ink particles themselves). Indirect erasure of Hashem's name is not prohibited (Shabbos 120b, cited in Minchas Chinuch 437:14; there is an extensive discussion of the details of this law in the commentaries to Rambam, Hil. Yesodei Hatorah 6:6).

Two possibilities I can think of:

  • The E-ink is not permanent stuff (it disappears as soon as the power is cut, for example). So it might be akin to writing Hashem's name in fruit juice or something similar. In the laws of Shabbos, that is not considered true "writing" (though it's still forbidden Rabbinically - see Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chaim 340:4 and Mishnah Berurah there :18 and :22), so possibly - though I haven't found any source to substantiate this - it may not be considered "writing" for this purpose either.

  • On these devices, as far as I know, you "erase" the words somewhat indirectly (by flipping to the next page, or turning them off, or whatever - but not by doing anything directly to the E-ink particles themselves). Indirect erasure of Hashem's name is not prohibited (Shabbos 120b, cited in Minchas Chinuch 437:14; there is an extensive discussion of the details of this law in the commentaries to Rambam, Hil. Yesodei Hatorah 6:6).

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source | link

Two possibilities I can think of:

  • The E-ink is not permanent stuff (it disappears as soon as the power is cut, for example). So it might be akin to writing Hashem's name in fruit juice or something similar. In the laws of Shabbos, that is not considered true "writing" (though it's still forbidden Rabbinically - see Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chaim 340:4 and Mishnah Berurah there :18 and :22), so possibly - though I haven't found any source to substantiate this - it may not be considered "writing" for this purpose either.

  • On these devices, as far as I know, you "erase" the words somewhat indirectly (by flipping to the next page, or turning them off, or whatever - but not by doing anything directly to the E-ink particles themselves). Indirect erasure of Hashem's name is not prohibited (Shabbos 120b, cited in Minchas Chinuch 437:14; there is an extensive discussion of the details of this law in the commentaries to Rambam, Hil. Yesodei Hatorah 6:6).