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Most people seem to be lenient about shemos on digital screens in general (though Bar-Ilan does avoid displaying the Tetragrammaton.) The letters on the screen are just light, there is nothing really written there. But what about on a E-reader, like a Kindle or a Nook? For those devices, actual particles form the words. Would one be allowed to erase shemos from them?

(Note: Currently, I don't think these devices display Hebrew text, so it's not yet a common issue.)

How the devices work: LCD Screens(link no longer valid) E-readers.

Most people seem to be lenient about shemos on digital screens in general (though Bar-Ilan does avoid displaying the Tetragrammaton.) The letters on the screen are just light, there is nothing really written there. But what about on a E-reader, like a Kindle or a Nook? For those devices, actual particles form the words. Would one be allowed to erase shemos from them?

(Note: Currently, I don't think these devices display Hebrew text, so it's not yet a common issue.)

How the devices work: LCD Screens E-readers.

Most people seem to be lenient about shemos on digital screens in general (though Bar-Ilan does avoid displaying the Tetragrammaton.) The letters on the screen are just light, there is nothing really written there. But what about on a E-reader, like a Kindle or a Nook? For those devices, actual particles form the words. Would one be allowed to erase shemos from them?

(Note: Currently, I don't think these devices display Hebrew text, so it's not yet a common issue.)

How the devices work: LCD Screens(link no longer valid) E-readers.

5 update removed
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Most people seem to be lenient about shemos on digital screens in general (though Bar-Ilan does avoid displaying the Tetragrammaton.) The letters on the screen are just light, there is nothing really written there. But what about on a E-reader, like a Kindle or a Nook? For those devices, actual particles form the words. Would one be allowed to erase shemos from them?

(Note: Currently, I don't think these devices display Hebrew text, so it's not yet a common issue.)

How the devices work: LCD Screens E-readers.

Update: There are many answers below to permit it, but there's now a bounty if anyone can provide full sources and arguments to back them up (or refute them). For example, show that the prohibition does not apply to such temporary floating writing, or that it depends on the da'as of the person.

Most people seem to be lenient about shemos on digital screens in general (though Bar-Ilan does avoid displaying the Tetragrammaton.) The letters on the screen are just light, there is nothing really written there. But what about on a E-reader, like a Kindle or a Nook? For those devices, actual particles form the words. Would one be allowed to erase shemos from them?

(Note: Currently, I don't think these devices display Hebrew text, so it's not yet a common issue.)

How the devices work: LCD Screens E-readers.

Update: There are many answers below to permit it, but there's now a bounty if anyone can provide full sources and arguments to back them up (or refute them). For example, show that the prohibition does not apply to such temporary floating writing, or that it depends on the da'as of the person.

Most people seem to be lenient about shemos on digital screens in general (though Bar-Ilan does avoid displaying the Tetragrammaton.) The letters on the screen are just light, there is nothing really written there. But what about on a E-reader, like a Kindle or a Nook? For those devices, actual particles form the words. Would one be allowed to erase shemos from them?

(Note: Currently, I don't think these devices display Hebrew text, so it's not yet a common issue.)

How the devices work: LCD Screens E-readers.

    Bounty Ended with Joe in Australia's answer chosen by Ariel K
4 added 305 characters in body
source | link

Most people seem to be lenient about shemos on digital screens in general (though Bar-Ilan does avoid displaying the Tetragrammaton.) The letters on the screen are just light, there is nothing really written there. But what about on a E-reader, like a Kindle or a Nook? For those devices, actual particles form the words. Would one be allowed to erase shemos from them?

(Note: Currently, I don't think these devices display Hebrew text, so it's not yet a common issue.)

How the devices work: LCD Screens E-readers.

Update: There are many answers below to permit it, but there's now a bounty if anyone can provide full sources and arguments to back them up (or refute them). For example, show that the prohibition does not apply to such temporary floating writing, or that it depends on the da'as of the person.

Most people seem to be lenient about shemos on digital screens in general (though Bar-Ilan does avoid displaying the Tetragrammaton.) The letters on the screen are just light, there is nothing really written there. But what about on a E-reader, like a Kindle or a Nook? For those devices, actual particles form the words. Would one be allowed to erase shemos from them?

(Note: Currently, I don't think these devices display Hebrew text, so it's not yet a common issue.)

How the devices work: LCD Screens E-readers.

Most people seem to be lenient about shemos on digital screens in general (though Bar-Ilan does avoid displaying the Tetragrammaton.) The letters on the screen are just light, there is nothing really written there. But what about on a E-reader, like a Kindle or a Nook? For those devices, actual particles form the words. Would one be allowed to erase shemos from them?

(Note: Currently, I don't think these devices display Hebrew text, so it's not yet a common issue.)

How the devices work: LCD Screens E-readers.

Update: There are many answers below to permit it, but there's now a bounty if anyone can provide full sources and arguments to back them up (or refute them). For example, show that the prohibition does not apply to such temporary floating writing, or that it depends on the da'as of the person.

    Tweeted twitter.com/#!/StackJudaism/status/113369188302729216
    Bounty Started worth 50 reputation by Ariel K
3 added 5 characters in body
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2 Added tag.; edited tags
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