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Actually, tipcha is a bigger break than tevir, and even bigger than revii (even though many people don't read it that way). The side of the Tikkun Simanim points out places where it makes a difference to the meaning. One major case is in Reeh 12:2. A more recent place, where it's simpler to see the meaning although I don't think the Simanim says anything there, is in the maftir of Pesach (Pinchas 28:20):

וּמִ֨נְחָתָ֔ם סֹ֖לֶת בְּלוּלָ֣ה בַשָּׁ֑מֶן שְׁלֹשָׁ֨ה עֶשְׂרֹנִ֜ים לַפָּ֗ר וּשְׁנֵ֧י עֶשְׂרֹנִ֛ים לָאַ֖יִל תַּֽעֲשֽׂוּ׃

Because the tipcha is the biggest break after the etnachta, תעשו is going back on the menachot for both the bulls and the ram.

That means that the 3 times קדוש should be together, with a small break for the tevir and an even smaller one for the psik.

I think this is the same as what Chabad means. English punctuation and trop are not fully compatible with each other. In English we put commas in lists of more than two things (holy isn't a "thing," but you get the idea), and we only put commas after a list in places where they would be required even if there was only one item. In Tanach, because the list belongs together, we put a bigger separation after the list.

For example, try days 2-7 of Sukkot, also in Pinchas:

וּמִנְחָתָ֣ם וְנִסְכֵּיהֶ֡ם לַ֠פָּרִים לָֽאֵילִ֧ם וְלַכְּבָשִׂ֛ים בְּמִסְפָּרָ֖ם כַּמִּשְׁפָּֽט׃ (with small changes for the different days)

לאילם does not have a pausing trop. לפרים does have a weak pause on Sukkot (not even that on Shemini Atzeret), but the stronger pauses are before (pazer) and after (tevir) the list.

(במספרם has an even stronger stop (tipcha) because it's going on the animals, not on the menachot. This is another good example where reading it wrong changes the meaning.)

Actually, tipcha is a bigger break than tevir, and even bigger than revii (even though many people don't read it that way). The side of the Tikkun Simanim points out places where it makes a difference to the meaning. One major case is in Reeh 12:2. A more recent place, where it's simpler to see the meaning although I don't think the Simanim says anything there, is in the maftir of Pesach (Pinchas 28:20):

וּמִ֨נְחָתָ֔ם סֹ֖לֶת בְּלוּלָ֣ה בַשָּׁ֑מֶן שְׁלֹשָׁ֨ה עֶשְׂרֹנִ֜ים לַפָּ֗ר וּשְׁנֵ֧י עֶשְׂרֹנִ֛ים לָאַ֖יִל תַּֽעֲשֽׂוּ׃

Because the tipcha is the biggest break after the etnachta, תעשו is going back on the menachot for both the bulls and the ram.

That means that the 3 times קדוש should be together, with a small break for the tevir and an even smaller one for the psik.

Actually, tipcha is a bigger break than tevir, and even bigger than revii (even though many people don't read it that way). The side of the Tikkun Simanim points out places where it makes a difference to the meaning. One major case is in Reeh 12:2. A more recent place, where it's simpler to see the meaning although I don't think the Simanim says anything there, is in the maftir of Pesach (Pinchas 28:20):

וּמִ֨נְחָתָ֔ם סֹ֖לֶת בְּלוּלָ֣ה בַשָּׁ֑מֶן שְׁלֹשָׁ֨ה עֶשְׂרֹנִ֜ים לַפָּ֗ר וּשְׁנֵ֧י עֶשְׂרֹנִ֛ים לָאַ֖יִל תַּֽעֲשֽׂוּ׃

Because the tipcha is the biggest break after the etnachta, תעשו is going back on the menachot for both the bulls and the ram.

That means that the 3 times קדוש should be together, with a small break for the tevir and an even smaller one for the psik.

I think this is the same as what Chabad means. English punctuation and trop are not fully compatible with each other. In English we put commas in lists of more than two things (holy isn't a "thing," but you get the idea), and we only put commas after a list in places where they would be required even if there was only one item. In Tanach, because the list belongs together, we put a bigger separation after the list.

For example, try days 2-7 of Sukkot, also in Pinchas:

וּמִנְחָתָ֣ם וְנִסְכֵּיהֶ֡ם לַ֠פָּרִים לָֽאֵילִ֧ם וְלַכְּבָשִׂ֛ים בְּמִסְפָּרָ֖ם כַּמִּשְׁפָּֽט׃ (with small changes for the different days)

לאילם does not have a pausing trop. לפרים does have a weak pause on Sukkot (not even that on Shemini Atzeret), but the stronger pauses are before (pazer) and after (tevir) the list.

(במספרם has an even stronger stop (tipcha) because it's going on the animals, not on the menachot. This is another good example where reading it wrong changes the meaning.)

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Actually, tipcha is a bigger break than tevir, and even bigger than revii (even though many people don't read it that way). The side of the Tikkun Simanim points out places where it makes a difference to the meaning. One major case is in Reeh 12:2. A more recent place, where it's simpler to see the meaning although I don't think the Simanim says anything there, is in the maftir of Pesach (Pinchas 28:20):

וּמִ֨נְחָתָ֔ם סֹ֖לֶת בְּלוּלָ֣ה בַשָּׁ֑מֶן שְׁלֹשָׁ֨ה עֶשְׂרֹנִ֜ים לַפָּ֗ר וּשְׁנֵ֧י עֶשְׂרֹנִ֛ים לָאַ֖יִל תַּֽעֲשֽׂוּ׃

Because the tipcha is the biggest break after the etnachta, תעשו is going back on the menachot for both the bulls and the ram.

That means that the 3 times קדוש should be together, with a small break for the tevir and an even smaller one for the psik.