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There are actually many laws that must be kept for a plantapply to beplants, too, to make them "kosher", but they are all connected with/ apply in the Land of Israel. What makes a plant "kosher" is not the specific species of plant (which is what determines the kashrut of something from the animal kingdom), but how and where it was grown, and the laws that apply to it once you want to use it. All of these laws fully apply in the Land of Israel when there is a Temple standing. Some apply (sometimes in a more limited way) at all times in the Land of Israel. And a few (like orlah, challa, chadash according to some opinions) apply outside Israel too. (Some are rabbinic rather than Torah law today.)

  1. Fruit grown on trees that are under three years old are called orlah and are forbidden to be eaten. The fruit of the fourth year must be eaten under conditions (that we don't have now) in Jerusalem or redeemed.
  2. All produce grown in the Land of Israel must have tithes given to the priests and Levites and the poor (truma and trumat maaser, maaser sheni and maaser oni), and these laws still apply today.
  3. There are laws regarding the shemitta (sabbatical) year, and produce grown in a prohibited way during the sabbatical year may also be prohibited. Fruits that grow by themselves have holiness (kedushas shviis) and are subject to particular laws (not to waste them, to use them in the usual way, not to buy and sell them, etc.)
  4. A portion of our dough (challa) is given to the priest (kohen). Since the kohen cannot eat it today (because he cannot become ritually pure), it is separated and burned. But dough that didn't have challa separated is non-kosher. Some
  5. The "new" grain (chadash) cannot be eaten until the omer offering is harvested on the 2nd night of these laws also apply outsidePesach (Passover). Today, we must still wait for the Land2nd day of Israel in a more limited wayPesach until eating new grain.

There are many laws that must be kept for a plant to be "kosher", but they are all connected to the Land of Israel.

  1. Fruit grown on trees that are under three years old are called orlah and are forbidden to be eaten. The fruit of the fourth year must be eaten under conditions (that we don't have now) in Jerusalem or redeemed.
  2. All produce grown in the Land of Israel must have tithes given to the priests and Levites and the poor (truma and trumat maaser, maaser sheni and maaser oni), and these laws still apply today.
  3. There are laws regarding the shemitta (sabbatical) year, and produce grown in a prohibited way during the sabbatical year may also be prohibited. Fruits that grow by themselves have holiness (kedushas shviis) and are subject to particular laws (not to waste them, to use them in the usual way, not to buy and sell them, etc.)
  4. A portion of our dough (challa) is given to the priest (kohen). Since the kohen cannot eat it today (because he cannot become ritually pure), it is separated and burned. But dough that didn't have challa separated is non-kosher. Some of these laws also apply outside the Land of Israel in a more limited way.

There are actually many laws that apply to plants, too, to make them "kosher", but they are all connected with/ apply in the Land of Israel. What makes a plant "kosher" is not the specific species of plant (which is what determines the kashrut of something from the animal kingdom), but how and where it was grown, and the laws that apply to it once you want to use it. All of these laws fully apply in the Land of Israel when there is a Temple standing. Some apply (sometimes in a more limited way) at all times in the Land of Israel. And a few (like orlah, challa, chadash according to some opinions) apply outside Israel too. (Some are rabbinic rather than Torah law today.)

  1. Fruit grown on trees that are under three years old are called orlah and are forbidden to be eaten. The fruit of the fourth year must be eaten under conditions (that we don't have now) in Jerusalem or redeemed.
  2. All produce grown in the Land of Israel must have tithes given to the priests and Levites and the poor (truma and trumat maaser, maaser sheni and maaser oni), and these laws still apply today.
  3. There are laws regarding the shemitta (sabbatical) year, and produce grown in a prohibited way during the sabbatical year may also be prohibited. Fruits that grow by themselves have holiness (kedushas shviis) and are subject to particular laws (not to waste them, to use them in the usual way, not to buy and sell them, etc.)
  4. A portion of our dough (challa) is given to the priest (kohen). Since the kohen cannot eat it today (because he cannot become ritually pure), it is separated and burned. But dough that didn't have challa separated is non-kosher.
  5. The "new" grain (chadash) cannot be eaten until the omer offering is harvested on the 2nd night of Pesach (Passover). Today, we must still wait for the 2nd day of Pesach until eating new grain.
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There are many laws that must be kept for a plant to be "kosher", but they are all connected to the Land of Israel. 1. Fruit grown on trees that are under three years old are called orlah and are forbidden to be eaten. The fruit of the fourth year must be eaten under conditions (that we don't have now) in Jerusalem or redeemed. 2. All produce grown in the Land of Israel must have tithes given to the priests and Levites and the poor (truma and trumat maaser, maaser sheni and maaser oni), and these laws still apply today. 3. There are laws regarding the shemitta (sabbatical) year, and produce grown in a prohibited way during the sabbatical year may also be prohibited. Fruits that grow by themselves have holiness (kedushas shviis) and are subject to particular laws (not to waste them, to use them in the usual way, not to buy and sell them, etc.) 4. A portion of our dough (challa) is given to the priest (kohen). Since the kohen cannot eat it today (because he cannot become ritually pure), it is separated and burned. But dough that didn't have challa separated is non-kosher. Some of these laws also apply outside the Land of Israel in a more limited way.

  1. Fruit grown on trees that are under three years old are called orlah and are forbidden to be eaten. The fruit of the fourth year must be eaten under conditions (that we don't have now) in Jerusalem or redeemed.
  2. All produce grown in the Land of Israel must have tithes given to the priests and Levites and the poor (truma and trumat maaser, maaser sheni and maaser oni), and these laws still apply today.
  3. There are laws regarding the shemitta (sabbatical) year, and produce grown in a prohibited way during the sabbatical year may also be prohibited. Fruits that grow by themselves have holiness (kedushas shviis) and are subject to particular laws (not to waste them, to use them in the usual way, not to buy and sell them, etc.)
  4. A portion of our dough (challa) is given to the priest (kohen). Since the kohen cannot eat it today (because he cannot become ritually pure), it is separated and burned. But dough that didn't have challa separated is non-kosher. Some of these laws also apply outside the Land of Israel in a more limited way.

There are many laws that must be kept for a plant to be "kosher", but they are all connected to the Land of Israel. 1. Fruit grown on trees that are under three years old are called orlah and are forbidden to be eaten. The fruit of the fourth year must be eaten under conditions (that we don't have now) in Jerusalem or redeemed. 2. All produce grown in the Land of Israel must have tithes given to the priests and Levites and the poor (truma and trumat maaser, maaser sheni and maaser oni), and these laws still apply today. 3. There are laws regarding the shemitta (sabbatical) year, and produce grown in a prohibited way during the sabbatical year may also be prohibited. Fruits that grow by themselves have holiness (kedushas shviis) and are subject to particular laws (not to waste them, to use them in the usual way, not to buy and sell them, etc.) 4. A portion of our dough (challa) is given to the priest (kohen). Since the kohen cannot eat it today (because he cannot become ritually pure), it is separated and burned. But dough that didn't have challa separated is non-kosher. Some of these laws also apply outside the Land of Israel in a more limited way.

There are many laws that must be kept for a plant to be "kosher", but they are all connected to the Land of Israel.

  1. Fruit grown on trees that are under three years old are called orlah and are forbidden to be eaten. The fruit of the fourth year must be eaten under conditions (that we don't have now) in Jerusalem or redeemed.
  2. All produce grown in the Land of Israel must have tithes given to the priests and Levites and the poor (truma and trumat maaser, maaser sheni and maaser oni), and these laws still apply today.
  3. There are laws regarding the shemitta (sabbatical) year, and produce grown in a prohibited way during the sabbatical year may also be prohibited. Fruits that grow by themselves have holiness (kedushas shviis) and are subject to particular laws (not to waste them, to use them in the usual way, not to buy and sell them, etc.)
  4. A portion of our dough (challa) is given to the priest (kohen). Since the kohen cannot eat it today (because he cannot become ritually pure), it is separated and burned. But dough that didn't have challa separated is non-kosher. Some of these laws also apply outside the Land of Israel in a more limited way.
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There are many laws that must be kept for a plant to be "kosher", but they are all connected to the Land of Israel. 1. Fruit grown on trees that are under three years old are called orlah and are forbidden to be eaten. The fruit of the fourth year must be eaten under conditions (that we don't have now) in Jerusalem or redeemed. 2. All produce grown in the Land of Israel must have tithes given to the priests and Levites and the poor (truma and trumat maaser, maaser sheni and maaser oni), and these laws still apply today. 3. There are laws regarding the shemitta (sabbatical) year, and produce grown in a prohibited way during the sabbatical year may also be prohibited. Fruits that grow by themselves have holiness (kedushas shviis) and are subject to particular laws (not to waste them, to use them in the usual way, not to buy and sell them, etc.) 4. A portion of our dough (challa) is given to the priest (kohen). Since the kohen cannot eat it today (because he cannot become ritually pure), it is separated and burned. But dough that didn't have challa separated is non-kosher. Some of these laws also apply outside the Land of Israel in a more limited way.