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There could be a variety of problems with the klaf.

Klaf is made from the skin of cows. A "fresh" klaf has a texture or grain of "pores" which absorb the ink and hold it to the klaf. With time and use the texture/pore become smooth and the adhesion of the klaf becomes suspect, i.e the repairs (new ink) dont stick to the klaf.

Certain older klafs have an additional problem that they were coated with some sort of material (I think its some sort of plaster or lime) before they were written on. When this coating begins to deteriorate, fixing the torah is impossible due to the fact that as you try to make corrections additional adjacent parts of the klaf get damaged.

If the original sofer had a consistent issue that affects the entire scroll, like if a certain letter was improperly written or written in a way that makes it susceptible to becoming pasul, it becomes difficult to fix due to the large amount of work involved. If he had problems with many letters or with taggim it may cost significantly more than writing a new Torah.

Age can also cause the ink to fade or discolour, in some cases this causes the torah to be pasul. (I have seen a Torah in which the letters tuned RED!) Fixing such a sefer can equal a almost total rewrite, which can cost many times the cost of a new sefer (due to the need for erasure before writing) and may be impossible due to the condition of the klaf.

If the issue is a problem with the way one of Hashem's names is written, in some cases the psul in not correctable, the only solution being the replacement of the particular piece of parchment (Yeria).

If the Torah has such problems on many different pieces of parchment the Torah is unfixable.

If the writing in the sefer torah is of poor quality (very bidieved) a sofer may advise not atempting a fix of many small issues due to the cost vs benefit of buying a new Torah.

If the particular Torah has any special significance, i.e. belonged to a famous rabbi or chassidic rebbe, was rescued from germany during the holocaust or was originaly written by a famous sofer, some people may decide that it is worth to repair the scroll even a a price many times that of a new scroll.

There could be a variety of problems with the klaf.

Klaf is made from the skin of cows. A "fresh" klaf has a texture or grain of "pores" which absorb the ink and hold it to the klaf. With time and use the texture/pore become smooth and the adhesion of the klaf becomes suspect, i.e the repairs (new ink) dont stick to the klaf.

Certain older klafs have an additional problem that they were coated with some sort of material (I think its some sort of plaster or lime) before they were written on. When this coating begins to deteriorate, fixing the torah is impossible due to the fact that as you try to make corrections additional adjacent parts of the klaf get damaged.

If the original sofer had a consistent issue that affects the entire scroll, like if a certain letter was improperly written or written in a way that makes it susceptible to becoming pasul, it becomes difficult to fix due to the large amount of work involved. If he had problems with many letters or with taggim it may cost significantly more than writing a new Torah.

Age can also cause the ink to fade or discolour, in some cases this causes the torah to be pasul. (I have seen a Torah in which the letters tuned RED!) Fixing such a sefer can equal a almost total rewrite, which can cost many times the cost of a new sefer (due to the need for erasure before writing) and may be impossible due to the condition of the klaf.

If the issue is a problem with the way one of Hashem's names is written, in some cases the psul in not correctable, the only solution being the replacement of the particular piece of parchment (Yeria).

If the Torah has such problems on many different pieces of parchment the Torah is unfixable.

If the writing in the sefer torah is of poor quality (very bidieved) a sofer may advise not atempting a fix of many small issues due to the cost vs benefit of buying a new Torah.

There could be a variety of problems with the klaf.

Klaf is made from the skin of cows. A "fresh" klaf has a texture or grain of "pores" which absorb the ink and hold it to the klaf. With time and use the texture/pore become smooth and the adhesion of the klaf becomes suspect, i.e the repairs (new ink) dont stick to the klaf.

Certain older klafs have an additional problem that they were coated with some sort of material (I think its some sort of plaster or lime) before they were written on. When this coating begins to deteriorate, fixing the torah is impossible due to the fact that as you try to make corrections additional adjacent parts of the klaf get damaged.

If the original sofer had a consistent issue that affects the entire scroll, like if a certain letter was improperly written or written in a way that makes it susceptible to becoming pasul, it becomes difficult to fix due to the large amount of work involved. If he had problems with many letters or with taggim it may cost significantly more than writing a new Torah.

Age can also cause the ink to fade or discolour, in some cases this causes the torah to be pasul. (I have seen a Torah in which the letters tuned RED!) Fixing such a sefer can equal a almost total rewrite, which can cost many times the cost of a new sefer (due to the need for erasure before writing) and may be impossible due to the condition of the klaf.

If the issue is a problem with the way one of Hashem's names is written, in some cases the psul in not correctable, the only solution being the replacement of the particular piece of parchment (Yeria).

If the Torah has such problems on many different pieces of parchment the Torah is unfixable.

If the writing in the sefer torah is of poor quality (very bidieved) a sofer may advise not atempting a fix of many small issues due to the cost vs benefit of buying a new Torah.

If the particular Torah has any special significance, i.e. belonged to a famous rabbi or chassidic rebbe, was rescued from germany during the holocaust or was originaly written by a famous sofer, some people may decide that it is worth to repair the scroll even a a price many times that of a new scroll.

4 added 445 characters in body
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There could be a variety of problems with the klaf.

Klaf is made from the skin of cows. A "fresh" klaf has a texture or grain of "pores" which absorb the ink and hold it to the klaf. With time and use the texture/pore become smooth and the adhesion of the klaf becomes suspect, i.e the repairs (new ink) dont stick to the klaf.

Certain older klafs have an additional problem that they were coated with some sort of material (I think its some sort of plaster or lime) before they were written on. When this coating begins to deteriorate, fixing the torah is impossible due to the fact that as you try to make corrections additional adjacent parts of the klaf get damaged.

If the original sofer had a consistent issue that affects the entire scroll, like if a certain letter was improperly written or written in a way that makes it susceptible to becoming pasul, it becomes difficult to fix due to the large amount of work involved. If he had problems with many letters or with taggim it may cost significantly more than writing a new Torah.

Age can also cause the ink to fade or discolour, in some cases this causes the torah to be pasul. (I have seen a Torah in which the letters tuned RED!) Fixing such a sefer can equal a almost total rewrite, which can cost many times the cost of a new sefer (due to the need for erasure before writing) and may be impossible due to the condition of the klaf.

If the issue is a problem with the way one of Hashem's names is written, in some cases the psul in not correctable, the only solution being the replacement of the particular piece of parchment (Yeria).

If the Torah has such problems on many different pieces of parchment the Torah is unfixable.

If the writing in the sefer torah is of poor quality (very bidieved) a sofer may advise not atempting a fix of many small issues due to the cost vs benefit of buying a new Torah.

There could be a variety of problems with the klaf.

Klaf is made from the skin of cows. A "fresh" klaf has a texture or grain of "pores" which absorb the ink and hold it to the klaf. With time and use the texture/pore become smooth and the adhesion of the klaf becomes suspect, i.e the repairs dont stick to the klaf.

Certain older klafs have an additional problem that they were coated with some sort of material (I think its some sort of plaster or lime) before they were written on. When this coating begins to deteriorate, fixing the torah is impossible due to the fact that as you try to make corrections additional adjacent parts of the klaf get damaged.

If the original sofer had a consistent issue that affects the entire scroll, like if a certain letter was improperly written or written in a way that makes it susceptible to becoming pasul, it becomes difficult to fix due to the large amount of work involved. If he had problems with many letters or with taggim it may cost significantly more than writing a new Torah.

If the issue is a problem with the way one of Hashem's names is written, in some cases the psul in not correctable, the only solution being the replacement of the particular piece of parchment (Yeria).

If the Torah has such problems on many different pieces of parchment the Torah is unfixable.

There could be a variety of problems with the klaf.

Klaf is made from the skin of cows. A "fresh" klaf has a texture or grain of "pores" which absorb the ink and hold it to the klaf. With time and use the texture/pore become smooth and the adhesion of the klaf becomes suspect, i.e the repairs (new ink) dont stick to the klaf.

Certain older klafs have an additional problem that they were coated with some sort of material (I think its some sort of plaster or lime) before they were written on. When this coating begins to deteriorate, fixing the torah is impossible due to the fact that as you try to make corrections additional adjacent parts of the klaf get damaged.

If the original sofer had a consistent issue that affects the entire scroll, like if a certain letter was improperly written or written in a way that makes it susceptible to becoming pasul, it becomes difficult to fix due to the large amount of work involved. If he had problems with many letters or with taggim it may cost significantly more than writing a new Torah.

Age can also cause the ink to fade or discolour, in some cases this causes the torah to be pasul. (I have seen a Torah in which the letters tuned RED!) Fixing such a sefer can equal a almost total rewrite, which can cost many times the cost of a new sefer (due to the need for erasure before writing) and may be impossible due to the condition of the klaf.

If the issue is a problem with the way one of Hashem's names is written, in some cases the psul in not correctable, the only solution being the replacement of the particular piece of parchment (Yeria).

If the Torah has such problems on many different pieces of parchment the Torah is unfixable.

If the writing in the sefer torah is of poor quality (very bidieved) a sofer may advise not atempting a fix of many small issues due to the cost vs benefit of buying a new Torah.

3 deleted 4 characters in body
source | link

There could be a variety of problems with the klaf.

Klaf is made from the skin of cows. A "fresh" klaf has a texture or grain of "pores" which absorb the ink and hold it to the klaf. With time and use the texture/pore become smooth and the adheisionadhesion of the klaf becomes suspect, i.e the repairs dont stick to the klaf.

Certain older klafs have an additional problem that they were coated with some sort of material (I think its some sort of plaster or lime) before they were written on. When this coatincoating begins to deteriorate, fixing the torah is immpossibleimpossible due to the fact that as you try to make corrections additional addjacentadjacent parts of th ethe klaf get damaged.

If the origninaloriginal sofer had a consistent issue that affects the entire scroll, like if a certain letter was improperly written or written in a way that makes it suseptablesusceptible to becoming pasul, it becomes difficult to fix due to the large amount of work involved. If he had problems with many letters or with taggim it may cost significantly more than writtingwriting a new torahTorah.

If the issue is a problem with the way one of hashemsHashem's names is written, in some cases the psul in not correctable, the only sollutionsolution being the replacement of the particular piece of parchment (Yeria).

If the torahTorah has such problems on many different pieces of parchment the torahTorah is unfixable.

There could be a variety of problems with the klaf.

Klaf is made from the skin of cows. A "fresh" klaf has a texture or grain of "pores" which absorb the ink and hold it to the klaf. With time and use the texture/pore become smooth and the adheision of the klaf becomes suspect, i.e the repairs dont stick to the klaf.

Certain older klafs have an additional problem that they were coated with some sort of material (I think its some sort of plaster or lime) before they were written on. When this coatin begins to deteriorate, fixing the torah is immpossible due to the fact that as you try to make corrections additional addjacent parts of th e klaf get damaged.

If the origninal sofer had a consistent issue that affects the entire scroll, like if a certain letter was improperly written or written in a way that makes it suseptable to becoming pasul, it becomes difficult to fix due to the large amount of work involved. If he had problems with many letters or with taggim it may cost significantly more than writting a new torah.

If the issue is a problem with the way one of hashems names is written, in some cases the psul in not correctable, the only sollution being the replacement of the particular piece of parchment (Yeria).

If the torah has such problems on many different pieces of parchment the torah is unfixable.

There could be a variety of problems with the klaf.

Klaf is made from the skin of cows. A "fresh" klaf has a texture or grain of "pores" which absorb the ink and hold it to the klaf. With time and use the texture/pore become smooth and the adhesion of the klaf becomes suspect, i.e the repairs dont stick to the klaf.

Certain older klafs have an additional problem that they were coated with some sort of material (I think its some sort of plaster or lime) before they were written on. When this coating begins to deteriorate, fixing the torah is impossible due to the fact that as you try to make corrections additional adjacent parts of the klaf get damaged.

If the original sofer had a consistent issue that affects the entire scroll, like if a certain letter was improperly written or written in a way that makes it susceptible to becoming pasul, it becomes difficult to fix due to the large amount of work involved. If he had problems with many letters or with taggim it may cost significantly more than writing a new Torah.

If the issue is a problem with the way one of Hashem's names is written, in some cases the psul in not correctable, the only solution being the replacement of the particular piece of parchment (Yeria).

If the Torah has such problems on many different pieces of parchment the Torah is unfixable.

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