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These terms, found in ibn Tibbon's translation of the second chapter of the Guide of the Perplexed, are specialized words used in Aristotelian philosophy, so they carry a lot of meaning that can't easily be summarized. Reading Aristotle or Aristotle's Arabic commentators would be the best way to learn about them.

Mefursamot is ibn Tibbon's Hebrew translation of mashhurat (singular: mashhur), which is the Arabic translation of the Greek word endoxa.

Muskalot is ibn Tibbon's translation of the Arabic al-umur al-ma'qula (singular: ma'qul), which is a translation of the Greek word noemanoumena. Muskalot are often called 'intelligibles' in English.

In general, I guess I would hesitatingly say that mefursamot are vague but emotionally charged notions, picked-up unconsciously, and affecting our attraction to, or repulsion from, various things we encounter in life. Muskalot are eternal truths that can only be perceived by a well-trained mind engaged in the highest form of pure contemplation.

An example of a mefursam would be a disgust for cannibalism. An example of a muskal would be God.

These terms, found in ibn Tibbon's translation of the second chapter of the Guide of the Perplexed, are specialized words used in Aristotelian philosophy, so they carry a lot of meaning that can't easily be summarized. Reading Aristotle or Aristotle's Arabic commentators would be the best way to learn about them.

Mefursamot is ibn Tibbon's Hebrew translation of mashhurat (singular: mashhur), which is the Arabic translation of the Greek word endoxa.

Muskalot is ibn Tibbon's translation of the Arabic al-umur al-ma'qula (singular: ma'qul), which is a translation of the Greek word noema. Muskalot are often called 'intelligibles' in English.

In general, I guess I would hesitatingly say that mefursamot are vague but emotionally charged notions, picked-up unconsciously, and affecting our attraction to, or repulsion from, various things we encounter in life. Muskalot are eternal truths that can only be perceived by a well-trained mind engaged in the highest form of pure contemplation.

An example of a mefursam would be a disgust for cannibalism. An example of a muskal would be God.

These terms, found in ibn Tibbon's translation of the second chapter of the Guide of the Perplexed, are specialized words used in Aristotelian philosophy, so they carry a lot of meaning that can't easily be summarized. Reading Aristotle or Aristotle's Arabic commentators would be the best way to learn about them.

Mefursamot is ibn Tibbon's Hebrew translation of mashhurat (singular: mashhur), which is the Arabic translation of the Greek word endoxa.

Muskalot is ibn Tibbon's translation of the Arabic al-umur al-ma'qula (singular: ma'qul), which is a translation of the Greek word noumena. Muskalot are often called 'intelligibles' in English.

In general, I guess I would hesitatingly say that mefursamot are vague but emotionally charged notions, picked-up unconsciously, and affecting our attraction to, or repulsion from, various things we encounter in life. Muskalot are eternal truths that can only be perceived by a well-trained mind engaged in the highest form of pure contemplation.

An example of a mefursam would be a disgust for cannibalism. An example of a muskal would be God.

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These terms, found in ibn Tibbon's translation of the second chapter of the Guide of the Perplexed, are specialized words used in Aristotelian philosophy, so they carry a lot of meaning that can't easily be summarized. Reading Aristotle or Aristotle's Arabic commentators would be the best way to learn about them.

Mefursamot is ibn Tibbon's Hebrew translation of mashhurat (singular: mashhur), which is the Arabic translation of the Greek word endoxa.

Muskalot is ibn Tibbon's translation of the Arabic al-umur al-ma'qula (singular: ma'qul), which is a translation of the Greek word noema. Muskalot are often called 'intelligibles' in English.

In general, I guess I would hesitatingly say that mefursamot are vague but emotionally charged notions, picked-up unconsciously from our societal environment, and affecting our attraction to, or repulsion from, various things we encounter in life. Muskalot are eternal truths that can only be perceived by a well-trained mind engaged in the highest form of pure contemplation.

An example of a mefursam would be a disgust for cannibalism. An example of a muskal would be God.

These terms, found in ibn Tibbon's translation of the second chapter of the Guide of the Perplexed, are specialized words used in Aristotelian philosophy, so they carry a lot of meaning that can't easily be summarized. Reading Aristotle or Aristotle's Arabic commentators would be the best way to learn about them.

Mefursamot is ibn Tibbon's Hebrew translation of mashhurat (singular: mashhur), which is the Arabic translation of the Greek word endoxa.

Muskalot is ibn Tibbon's translation of the Arabic al-umur al-ma'qula (singular: ma'qul), which is a translation of the Greek word noema. Muskalot are often called 'intelligibles' in English.

In general, I guess I would hesitatingly say that mefursamot are vague but emotionally charged notions, picked-up unconsciously from our societal environment, and affecting our attraction to, or repulsion from, various things we encounter in life. Muskalot are eternal truths that can only be perceived by a well-trained mind engaged in the highest form of pure contemplation.

An example of a mefursam would be a disgust for cannibalism. An example of a muskal would be God.

These terms, found in ibn Tibbon's translation of the second chapter of the Guide of the Perplexed, are specialized words used in Aristotelian philosophy, so they carry a lot of meaning that can't easily be summarized. Reading Aristotle or Aristotle's Arabic commentators would be the best way to learn about them.

Mefursamot is ibn Tibbon's Hebrew translation of mashhurat (singular: mashhur), which is the Arabic translation of the Greek word endoxa.

Muskalot is ibn Tibbon's translation of the Arabic al-umur al-ma'qula (singular: ma'qul), which is a translation of the Greek word noema. Muskalot are often called 'intelligibles' in English.

In general, I guess I would hesitatingly say that mefursamot are vague but emotionally charged notions, picked-up unconsciously, and affecting our attraction to, or repulsion from, various things we encounter in life. Muskalot are eternal truths that can only be perceived by a well-trained mind engaged in the highest form of pure contemplation.

An example of a mefursam would be a disgust for cannibalism. An example of a muskal would be God.

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These terms, found in ibn Tibbon's translation of the second chapter of the Guide of the Perplexed, are specialized words used in Aristotelian philosophy, so they carry a lot of meaning that can't easily be summarized. Reading Aristotle or Aristotle's Arabic commentators would be the best way to learn about them.

Mefursamot is ibn Tibbon's Hebrew translation of mashhurat (singular: mashhur), which is the Arabic translation of the Greek word endoxa.

Muskalot is ibn Tibbon's translation of the Arabic al-umur al-ma'qula (singular: ma'qul), which is a translation of the Greek word noema. Muskalot are often called 'intelligibles' in English.

In general, I guess I would hesitatingly say that mefursamot are vague but emotionally charged notions, picked-up unconsciously from our societal environment, and affecting our attraction to, or repulsion from, various things we encounter in life. Muskalot are eternal truths that can only be perceived by a well-trained mind engaged in the highest form of pure contemplation.

An example of a mefursam would be a disgust for cannibalism. An example of a muskal would be God.

In interpreting the story of Adam's fall, the Rambam is opening up a new direction: if we could skip over good and evil, would we lose out? Would we lose out if we were freed-up to think about higher things, about ultimate truths beyond our messy little lives? Would we lose out being able to think and understand thoroughly, instead of being pulled around by powerful emotions and vague ideas absorbed unconsciously as we grew up in our specific tribe or city? This is a way of stating what Adam might have lost when he chose to become immersed in good and evil, and also of pointing us toward a sense of a higher contemplative mode of life we might aspire to.

These terms, found in ibn Tibbon's translation of the second chapter of the Guide of the Perplexed, are specialized words used in Aristotelian philosophy, so they carry a lot of meaning that can't easily be summarized. Reading Aristotle or Aristotle's Arabic commentators would be the best way to learn about them.

Mefursamot is ibn Tibbon's Hebrew translation of mashhurat (singular: mashhur), which is the Arabic translation of the Greek word endoxa.

Muskalot is ibn Tibbon's translation of the Arabic al-umur al-ma'qula (singular: ma'qul), which is a translation of the Greek word noema. Muskalot are often called 'intelligibles' in English.

In general, I guess I would hesitatingly say that mefursamot are vague but emotionally charged notions, picked-up unconsciously from our societal environment, and affecting our attraction to, or repulsion from, various things we encounter in life. Muskalot are eternal truths that can only be perceived by a well-trained mind engaged in the highest form of pure contemplation.

An example of a mefursam would be a disgust for cannibalism. An example of a muskal would be God.

In interpreting the story of Adam's fall, the Rambam is opening up a new direction: if we could skip over good and evil, would we lose out? Would we lose out if we were freed-up to think about higher things, about ultimate truths beyond our messy little lives? Would we lose out being able to think and understand thoroughly, instead of being pulled around by powerful emotions and vague ideas absorbed unconsciously as we grew up in our specific tribe or city? This is a way of stating what Adam might have lost when he chose to become immersed in good and evil, and also of pointing us toward a sense of a higher contemplative mode of life we might aspire to.

These terms, found in ibn Tibbon's translation of the second chapter of the Guide of the Perplexed, are specialized words used in Aristotelian philosophy, so they carry a lot of meaning that can't easily be summarized. Reading Aristotle or Aristotle's Arabic commentators would be the best way to learn about them.

Mefursamot is ibn Tibbon's Hebrew translation of mashhurat (singular: mashhur), which is the Arabic translation of the Greek word endoxa.

Muskalot is ibn Tibbon's translation of the Arabic al-umur al-ma'qula (singular: ma'qul), which is a translation of the Greek word noema. Muskalot are often called 'intelligibles' in English.

In general, I guess I would hesitatingly say that mefursamot are vague but emotionally charged notions, picked-up unconsciously from our societal environment, and affecting our attraction to, or repulsion from, various things we encounter in life. Muskalot are eternal truths that can only be perceived by a well-trained mind engaged in the highest form of pure contemplation.

An example of a mefursam would be a disgust for cannibalism. An example of a muskal would be God.

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