2 eliminated roof problem
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There are threetwo problems that come to mind.

  1. There is a general law about building a sukkah, discussed in the Talmud (Sukkah 24b) and throughout rabbinic literature, that the walls of a sukkah should not sway in the wind. Modern responsa on canvas walls discuss this issue at great length (see, for example, Yaabia Omer O"H, vol. 9, 59:1) and the means to eliminate doubts about a wall's validity. I don't see how water will fit this criteria, since it is constantly moving with a mass never in one place. Unlike canvas or other material, there is no way to fasten it in one place (unless, you consider using ice: a separate question).
  2. How on earth can you place skhakh on top of a liquid? If some gravity-defying psychics comes along to solve this, then great. But I don't think you should disregard that problem offhand, as a sukkah will be never considered as such as long as its roof does not rest on top of its walls.
  3. It is not clear that water can be used as a legitimate wall, especially considering that many (including Ashkenazim) do not consider water a mechitza (Sh"A O"H 363:29). That halakha concerns the problems of an ocean as a boundary for an eruv. Discussing a sukkah water-wall would require examining what other situations, such as in an eruv, where water does or does not constitute a boundary.

There is a general law about building a sukkah, discussed in the Talmud (Sukkah 24b) and throughout rabbinic literature, that the walls of a sukkah should not sway in the wind. Modern responsa on canvas walls discuss this issue at great length (see, for example, Yaabia Omer O"H, vol. 9, 59:1) and the means to eliminate doubts about a wall's validity. I don't see how water will fit this criteria, since it is constantly moving with a mass never in one place. Unlike canvas or other material, there is no way to fasten it in one place (unless, you consider using ice: a separate question).

It is not clear that water can be used as a legitimate wall, especially considering that many (including Ashkenazim) do not consider water a mechitza (Sh"A O"H 363:29). That halakha concerns the problems of an ocean as a boundary for an eruv. Discussing a sukkah water-wall would require examining what other situations, such as in an eruv, where water does or does not constitute a boundary.

There are three problems that come to mind.

  1. There is a general law about building a sukkah, discussed in the Talmud (Sukkah 24b) and throughout rabbinic literature, that the walls of a sukkah should not sway in the wind. Modern responsa on canvas walls discuss this issue at great length (see, for example, Yaabia Omer O"H, vol. 9, 59:1) and the means to eliminate doubts about a wall's validity. I don't see how water will fit this criteria, since it is constantly moving with a mass never in one place. Unlike canvas or other material, there is no way to fasten it in one place (unless, you consider using ice: a separate question).
  2. How on earth can you place skhakh on top of a liquid? If some gravity-defying psychics comes along to solve this, then great. But I don't think you should disregard that problem offhand, as a sukkah will be never considered as such as long as its roof does not rest on top of its walls.
  3. It is not clear that water can be used as a legitimate wall, especially considering that many (including Ashkenazim) do not consider water a mechitza (Sh"A O"H 363:29). That halakha concerns the problems of an ocean as a boundary for an eruv. Discussing a sukkah water-wall would require examining what other situations, such as in an eruv, where water does or does not constitute a boundary.

There are two problems that come to mind.

There is a general law about building a sukkah, discussed in the Talmud (Sukkah 24b) and throughout rabbinic literature, that the walls of a sukkah should not sway in the wind. Modern responsa on canvas walls discuss this issue at great length (see, for example, Yaabia Omer O"H, vol. 9, 59:1) and the means to eliminate doubts about a wall's validity. I don't see how water will fit this criteria, since it is constantly moving with a mass never in one place. Unlike canvas or other material, there is no way to fasten it in one place (unless, you consider using ice: a separate question).

It is not clear that water can be used as a legitimate wall, especially considering that many (including Ashkenazim) do not consider water a mechitza (Sh"A O"H 363:29). That halakha concerns the problems of an ocean as a boundary for an eruv. Discussing a sukkah water-wall would require examining what other situations, such as in an eruv, where water does or does not constitute a boundary.

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source | link

There are three problems that come to mind.

  1. There is a general law about building a sukkah, discussed in the Talmud (Sukkah 24b) and throughout rabbinic literature, that the walls of a sukkah should not sway in the wind. Modern responsa on canvas walls discuss this issue at great length (see, for example, Yaabia Omer O"H, vol. 9, 59:1) and the means to eliminate doubts about a wall's validity. I don't see how water will fit this criteria, since it is constantly moving with a mass never in one place. Unlike canvas or other material, there is no way to fasten it in one place (unless, you consider using ice: a separate question).
  2. How on earth can you place skhakh on top of a liquid? If some gravity-defying psychics comes along to solve this, then great. But I don't think you should disregard that problem offhand, as a sukkah will be never considered as such as long as its roof does not rest on top of its walls.
  3. It is not clear that water can be used as a legitimate wall, especially considering that many (including Ashkenazim) do not consider water a mechitza (Sh"A O"H 363:29). That halakha concerns the problems of an ocean as a boundary for an eruv. Discussing a sukkah water-wall would require examining what other situations, such as in an eruv, where water does or does not constitute a boundary.