4 added 11 characters in body
source | link

There seems to be a negative connotation around Chabad Lubavitch - mostly caused by the mashichists. For someone that does not adhere to the beliefs of the mashichists (someone who believes that the Rebbe is the mashiach with different versions: he died but will come back, he never died, etc.) but admires the teachings of the chasidut of chabad, would learning the Tanya be detrimental?

If the learning is done with a chavrusa who happens to be a mashichist is that a reason for concern?

There seems to be a negative connotation around Chabad Lubavitch - mostly caused by the mashichists. For someone that does not adhere to the beliefs of the mashichists (someone who believes that is the mashiach with different versions: he died but will come back, he never died, etc) but admires the teachings of the chasidut of chabad, would learning the Tanya be detrimental?

If the learning is done with a chavrusa who happens to be a mashichist is that a reason for concern?

There seems to be a negative connotation around Chabad Lubavitch - mostly caused by the mashichists. For someone that does not adhere to the beliefs of the mashichists (someone who believes that the Rebbe is the mashiach with different versions: he died but will come back, he never died, etc.) but admires the teachings of the chasidut of chabad, would learning the Tanya be detrimental?

If the learning is done with a chavrusa who happens to be a mashichist is that a reason for concern?

3 edited tags
| link
2 added 116 characters in body
source | link

There seems to be a negative connotation around Chabad Lubavitch - mostly caused by the mashichists. For someone that does not adhere to the beliefs of the mashichists (someone who believes that is the mashiach with different versions: he died but will come back, he never died, etc) but admires the teachings of the chasidut of chabad, would learning the Tanya be detrimental?

If the learning is done with a chavrusa who happens to be a mashichist is that a reason for concern?

There seems to be a negative connotation around Chabad Lubavitch - mostly caused by the mashichists. For someone that does not adhere to the beliefs of the mashichists but admires the teachings of the chasidut of chabad, would learning the Tanya be detrimental?

If the learning is done with a chavrusa who happens to be a mashichist is that a reason for concern?

There seems to be a negative connotation around Chabad Lubavitch - mostly caused by the mashichists. For someone that does not adhere to the beliefs of the mashichists (someone who believes that is the mashiach with different versions: he died but will come back, he never died, etc) but admires the teachings of the chasidut of chabad, would learning the Tanya be detrimental?

If the learning is done with a chavrusa who happens to be a mashichist is that a reason for concern?

1
source | link