2 added 162 characters in body; added 30 characters in body
source | link

The Brown-Driver-Briggs Hebrew and English Lexicon defines it (referencing that pasuk in Yeshayahu) as "shining one, epithet of king of Babylon" and notes that it refers to "star of the morning" I.e. Venus.

The Hebrew ultimately comes from the same 3 letter root as הלל (halal) [the root being ה.ל.ל.] translated as "to shine". הילל is the noun related to that root, not a conjugation on the verb.

The Brown-Driver-Briggs Hebrew and English Lexicon defines it (referencing that pasuk in Yeshayahu) as "shining one, epithet of king of Babylon" and notes that it refers to "star of the morning" I.e. Venus.

The Brown-Driver-Briggs Hebrew and English Lexicon defines it (referencing that pasuk in Yeshayahu) as "shining one, epithet of king of Babylon" and notes that it refers to "star of the morning" I.e. Venus.

The Hebrew ultimately comes from the same 3 letter root as הלל (halal) [the root being ה.ל.ל.] translated as "to shine". הילל is the noun related to that root, not a conjugation on the verb.

1
source | link

The Brown-Driver-Briggs Hebrew and English Lexicon defines it (referencing that pasuk in Yeshayahu) as "shining one, epithet of king of Babylon" and notes that it refers to "star of the morning" I.e. Venus.