3 deleted 2 characters in body
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IIRC, I heard from R. Nota Greenblatt, that if one can successfully identify the fish as a koskerkosher species, it is permitted.

If it has been cut with a knife that be non-kosher, then the area of the cut should be washed out.

Similarly, KosherQuest (operated by R. E. Eidlitz) here states that fresh fish with fins and scales needs no hechsher.

IIRC, I heard from R. Nota Greenblatt, that if one can successfully identify the fish as a kosker species, it is permitted.

If it has been cut with a knife that be non-kosher, then the area of the cut should be washed out.

Similarly, KosherQuest (operated by R. E. Eidlitz) here states that fresh fish with fins and scales needs no hechsher.

IIRC, I heard from R. Nota Greenblatt, that if one can successfully identify the fish as a kosher species, it is permitted.

If it has been cut with a knife that be non-kosher, then the area of the cut should be washed out.

Similarly, KosherQuest (operated by R. E. Eidlitz) here states that fresh fish with fins and scales needs no hechsher.

2 added 186 characters in body
source | link

IIRC, I heard from R. Nota Greenblatt, that if one can successfully identify the fish as a kosker species, it is permitted.

If it has been cut with a knife that be non-kosher, then the area of the cut should be washed out.

Similarly, KosherQuest (operated by R. E. Eidlitz) here states that fresh fish with fins and scales needs no hechsher.

IIRC, I heard from R. Nota Greenblatt, that if one can successfully identify the fish as a kosker species, it is permitted.

If it has been cut with a knife that be non-kosher, then the area of the cut should be washed out.

IIRC, I heard from R. Nota Greenblatt, that if one can successfully identify the fish as a kosker species, it is permitted.

If it has been cut with a knife that be non-kosher, then the area of the cut should be washed out.

Similarly, KosherQuest (operated by R. E. Eidlitz) here states that fresh fish with fins and scales needs no hechsher.

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source | link

IIRC, I heard from R. Nota Greenblatt, that if one can successfully identify the fish as a kosker species, it is permitted.

If it has been cut with a knife that be non-kosher, then the area of the cut should be washed out.