3 replaced http://judaism.stackexchange.com/ with https://judaism.stackexchange.com/
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To flesh out Gershon's answerGershon's answer a bit more:

You wouldn't just say "Rashi's comment on page 84a", as that would have you looking all over the page. Instead, each comment of Rashi is prefaced by the Talmudic phrase on which he's commenting. (In some newer editions it's bold or a different font, to help you locate it more easily.) This is known as דברי המתחיל, (divrei ha-mas-chil or ha-mat-chil, Ashkenazic or Sephardic pronunciation), "the starting words."

Here, for instance, is a snippet of Rashi on Berachot 2a. (Courtesy of e-daf, courtesy of Tuvia's.) This edition has the Talmudic phrases in bold, which help:

Image of Rashi's comments on Berachot 2a

At the bottom, Rashi quotes the Talmud's phrase "Chalavim", and then comments -- "shel kol korbanot." So you would refer to this comment of Rashi as "Rashi, Berachot 2a, ד”ה חלבים"

The concept does exist in non-Talmudic scholarship as well, if you know where to look. From the Chicago Manual of Style:

Article from an encyclopedia:

[...] Put the article title, in quotes, after the abbreviation s.v. (sub versa, “under the word.”) [For example:]

Encyclopedia Britannica, 11th. ed., s.v. “Gilbert Keith Chesterton.”

Some Judaics journals will use "s.v." in English as a translation of ד”ה

To flesh out Gershon's answer a bit more:

You wouldn't just say "Rashi's comment on page 84a", as that would have you looking all over the page. Instead, each comment of Rashi is prefaced by the Talmudic phrase on which he's commenting. (In some newer editions it's bold or a different font, to help you locate it more easily.) This is known as דברי המתחיל, (divrei ha-mas-chil or ha-mat-chil, Ashkenazic or Sephardic pronunciation), "the starting words."

Here, for instance, is a snippet of Rashi on Berachot 2a. (Courtesy of e-daf, courtesy of Tuvia's.) This edition has the Talmudic phrases in bold, which help:

Image of Rashi's comments on Berachot 2a

At the bottom, Rashi quotes the Talmud's phrase "Chalavim", and then comments -- "shel kol korbanot." So you would refer to this comment of Rashi as "Rashi, Berachot 2a, ד”ה חלבים"

The concept does exist in non-Talmudic scholarship as well, if you know where to look. From the Chicago Manual of Style:

Article from an encyclopedia:

[...] Put the article title, in quotes, after the abbreviation s.v. (sub versa, “under the word.”) [For example:]

Encyclopedia Britannica, 11th. ed., s.v. “Gilbert Keith Chesterton.”

Some Judaics journals will use "s.v." in English as a translation of ד”ה

To flesh out Gershon's answer a bit more:

You wouldn't just say "Rashi's comment on page 84a", as that would have you looking all over the page. Instead, each comment of Rashi is prefaced by the Talmudic phrase on which he's commenting. (In some newer editions it's bold or a different font, to help you locate it more easily.) This is known as דברי המתחיל, (divrei ha-mas-chil or ha-mat-chil, Ashkenazic or Sephardic pronunciation), "the starting words."

Here, for instance, is a snippet of Rashi on Berachot 2a. (Courtesy of e-daf, courtesy of Tuvia's.) This edition has the Talmudic phrases in bold, which help:

Image of Rashi's comments on Berachot 2a

At the bottom, Rashi quotes the Talmud's phrase "Chalavim", and then comments -- "shel kol korbanot." So you would refer to this comment of Rashi as "Rashi, Berachot 2a, ד”ה חלבים"

The concept does exist in non-Talmudic scholarship as well, if you know where to look. From the Chicago Manual of Style:

Article from an encyclopedia:

[...] Put the article title, in quotes, after the abbreviation s.v. (sub versa, “under the word.”) [For example:]

Encyclopedia Britannica, 11th. ed., s.v. “Gilbert Keith Chesterton.”

Some Judaics journals will use "s.v." in English as a translation of ד”ה

2 clarified
source | link

To flesh out Gershon's answer a bit more:

You wouldn't just say "Rashi's comment on page 84a", as that would have you looking all over the page. Instead, each comment of Rashi is prefaced by the Talmudic phrase on which he's commenting. (In some newer editions it's bold or a different font, to help you locate it more easily.) This is known as דברי המתחיל, (divrei ha-mas-chil or ha-mat-chil, Ashkenazic or Sephardic pronunciation), "the starting words."

Here, for instance, is a snippet of Rashi on Berachot 2a. (Courtesy of e-daf, courtesy of Tuvia's.) This edition has the Talmudic phrases in bold, which help:

Image of Rashi's comments on Berachot 2a

At the bottom, Rashi quotes the Talmud's phrase "Chalavim", and then comments -- "shel kol korbanot." So you would refer to this comment of Rashi as "Rashi, Berachot 2a, ד”ה חלבים"

The concept does exist in non-Talmudic scholarship as well, if you know where to look. From the Chicago Manual of Style:

Article from an encyclopedia:

[...] Put the article title, in quotes, after the abbreviation s.v. (sub versa, “under the word.”) [For example:]

Encyclopedia Britannica, 11th. ed., s.v. “Gilbert Keith Chesterton.”

Some Judaics journals will use "s.v." in English as a translation of ד”ה

To flesh out Gershon's answer a bit more:

You wouldn't just say "Rashi's comment on page 84a", as that would have you looking all over the page. Instead, each comment of Rashi is prefaced by the Talmudic phrase on which he's commenting. (In some newer editions it's bold or a different font, to help you locate it more easily.) This is known as דברי המתחיל, (divrei ha-mas-chil) "the starting words."

The concept does exist in non-Talmudic scholarship as well, if you know where to look. From the Chicago Manual of Style:

Article from an encyclopedia:

[...] Put the article title, in quotes, after the abbreviation s.v. (sub versa, “under the word.”) [For example:]

Encyclopedia Britannica, 11th. ed., s.v. “Gilbert Keith Chesterton.”

Some Judaics journals will use "s.v." in English as a translation of ד”ה

To flesh out Gershon's answer a bit more:

You wouldn't just say "Rashi's comment on page 84a", as that would have you looking all over the page. Instead, each comment of Rashi is prefaced by the Talmudic phrase on which he's commenting. (In some newer editions it's bold or a different font, to help you locate it more easily.) This is known as דברי המתחיל, (divrei ha-mas-chil or ha-mat-chil, Ashkenazic or Sephardic pronunciation), "the starting words."

Here, for instance, is a snippet of Rashi on Berachot 2a. (Courtesy of e-daf, courtesy of Tuvia's.) This edition has the Talmudic phrases in bold, which help:

Image of Rashi's comments on Berachot 2a

At the bottom, Rashi quotes the Talmud's phrase "Chalavim", and then comments -- "shel kol korbanot." So you would refer to this comment of Rashi as "Rashi, Berachot 2a, ד”ה חלבים"

The concept does exist in non-Talmudic scholarship as well, if you know where to look. From the Chicago Manual of Style:

Article from an encyclopedia:

[...] Put the article title, in quotes, after the abbreviation s.v. (sub versa, “under the word.”) [For example:]

Encyclopedia Britannica, 11th. ed., s.v. “Gilbert Keith Chesterton.”

Some Judaics journals will use "s.v." in English as a translation of ד”ה

1
source | link

To flesh out Gershon's answer a bit more:

You wouldn't just say "Rashi's comment on page 84a", as that would have you looking all over the page. Instead, each comment of Rashi is prefaced by the Talmudic phrase on which he's commenting. (In some newer editions it's bold or a different font, to help you locate it more easily.) This is known as דברי המתחיל, (divrei ha-mas-chil) "the starting words."

The concept does exist in non-Talmudic scholarship as well, if you know where to look. From the Chicago Manual of Style:

Article from an encyclopedia:

[...] Put the article title, in quotes, after the abbreviation s.v. (sub versa, “under the word.”) [For example:]

Encyclopedia Britannica, 11th. ed., s.v. “Gilbert Keith Chesterton.”

Some Judaics journals will use "s.v." in English as a translation of ד”ה