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I recall learning (many years ago) that in a case of accidental killing that qualifies the "killer" to go to an Ir Miklat, the victim in the case was someone who deserved a death penalty but the human court could not carry through with that punishment, so the "accident" was divinely arranged so that justice could be done. 

Ignoring the theological implications, I am wondering if anyone knows a source for this (other than my possibly over active imagination).

I recall learning (many years ago) that in a case of accidental killing that qualifies the "killer" to go to an Ir Miklat, the victim in the case was someone who deserved a death penalty but the human court could not carry through with that punishment, so the "accident" was divinely arranged so that justice could be done. Ignoring the theological implications, I am wondering if anyone knows a source for this (other than my possibly over active imagination).

I recall learning (many years ago) that in a case of accidental killing that qualifies the "killer" to go to an Ir Miklat, the victim in the case was someone who deserved a death penalty but the human court could not carry through with that punishment, so the "accident" was divinely arranged so that justice could be done. 

Ignoring the theological implications, I am wondering if anyone knows a source for this (other than my possibly over active imagination).

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Victim of an Accidental Killing - Source

I recall learning (many years ago) that in a case of accidental killing that qualifies the "killer" to go to an Ir Miklat, the victim in the case was someone who deserved a death penalty but the human court could not carry through with that punishment, so the "accident" was divinely arranged so that justice could be done. Ignoring the theological implications, I am wondering if anyone knows a source for this (other than my possibly over active imagination).